Class Listing

Spring 2018

  • Richmond Campus

    • BIBL111/Lecture/R – Evolution of Morality & Moral Systems | Credits 3.00 
      Is what is morally good commanded by God because it is morally good, or is it morally good because God commands it? (cf. Leibnitz). The question, a variation on the one Socrates puts to Euthyphro, presupposes a connection between God (or the gods) and morality. Whether God is in the moral system, or creates the moral system, or is the moral system may be debated, but in the ancient world – and in much of contemporary biblical theology – it is assumed that the Judge of all the earth will do justice. What Abraham may have assumed about God’s justice, however, is no longer the default position in the modern world, where moral visions and the moral systems they support (political, economic, and religious) are constantly changing. Is there a normative (prescriptive) basis for morality? Is morality and ethics a Darwinian adaptation to historical and cultural conditions? This course will place biblical and theological conceptualizations of morality and ethics into critical conversation with readings from moral philosophy, evolutionary biology, bio-cultural anthropology, cognitive science, and aesthetics. What is or should be the moral vision for truth and justice in the modern world, and how might the community of faith serve as a moral agent in constructing, repairing, and sustaining moral systems that relentlessly weave together the beautiful, the true, and the good?

      BIBL122/Lecture/R – The Theology of Paul | Credits 3.00 
      The letters of Paul present a robust and profound theological vision, one that has exerted enormous influence in the nearly twenty centuries since he composed them. This course will explore the theological claims, convictions, and commitments of Paul as he articulates them in response to the circumstances and challenges of his first-century churches. We will also forge connections between the theology of Paul—as both provocation and resource—and the situation and challenges confronting faith communities in the twenty-first century.

      BIBL210/Lecture/R – Old Testament II: Prophets & Writings | Credits 3.00 
      This course introduces the Prophets and the Writings of the Old Testament in English translation. Attention is given to the content, history, and theology of prophecy and prophetic literature in Israel, along with the varied works that comprise the Writings. Seminar sessions designed to enable students to develop their exegetical and teaching skills complement lectures and assigned readings in which current biblical scholarship is presented. Consideration will be devoted to the significance of this literature for the work of the church today.

      BIBL220/Lecture/R – New Testament II: Epistles & Apocalypse | Credits 3.00 
      This course focuses on the letters of Paul, but also introduces the general epistles and Revelation. Close reading of the Pauline epistles highlights Paul’s cultural world, the particular situations that prompted him to write these letters, and his theological vision. Reading of selected general epistles and the Book of Revelation opens up interpretive issues raised by these writings. Through lectures, seminar and small-group discussion, and papers, students explore the theological message of New Testament texts, strengthen exegetical skills, and draw connections between these first-century texts and the work of the church today.

      BIBL301/Lecture/R – Old Testament II: Prophets & Writings | Credits 3.00 
      This course introduces the Prophets and the Writings and provides practice in the exegesis of texts in the Hebrew Bible. Primary concentration is on the texts of the English and Hebrew Bibles, although secondary literature is used as a resource. Attention is given to the content, history, and theology of prophecy and prophetic literature in Israel, along with the varied works that comprise the Writings. Consideration will be devoted to the significance of this literature for the work of the church today.

      BIBL302/Lecture/R – New Testament II: Epistles & Apocalypse | Credits 3.00 
      This course focuses on the letters of Paul, but also introduces the general epistles and Revelation. Close reading of the Pauline epistles highlights Paul’s cultural world, the particular situations that prompted him to write these letters, and his theological vision. Reading of selected general epistles and the Book of Revelation opens up interpretive issues raised by these writings. Through lectures, seminar and small-group discussion, and papers, students explore the theological message of New Testament texts, strengthen exegetical skills, and draw connections between these first-century texts and the work of the church today.

      CITW199/Lecture-CWCom Engage/C – Church in the World Internship | Credits 3.00 
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “community engagement” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      CPE100/Lecture-CWInterfaith/R – Clinical Pastoral Education I | Credits 3.00 
      CPE100 Clinical Pastoral Education I requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff.

      CPE101/Lecture/R – Clinical Pastoral Education II | Credits 3.00 
      CPE101 Clinical Pastoral Education II requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff. Prerequisite: CPE100.

      EDTH220/Lecture/R – Contemporary Theology & Education | Credits 3.00 
      This course explores the challenges and possibilities that contemporary global theologies present for theological reflection and invites students to study and experiment with different methods for engaging in theological reflection that encourage appreciation for human diversity and ecclesial traditions.

      ETHC101/Lecture/R – Introduction to Christian Ethics | Credits 3.00
      This course introduces the discipline of theological ethics in ways appropriate to the interests of pastors. A range of contemporary proposals are considered and evaluated by reference to the Christian tradition and selected moral problems. Course format includes readings, lectures, seminars, mid-term, and final examinations.

      FTHF210/410/Lecture/R – Faith & Human Development | Credits 3.00 
      This course explores historical and contemporary theories of human psychology and faith across the lifespan, with particular attention to how these theories shape teaching and learning among all ages in the church. Prerequisites: EDTH110.

      HIST106/Lecture/R – Roles of Women in Christian Tradition | Credits 3.00
      This course explores the leadership roles of women in the church from its inception to modernity. We will study women who have transcended cultural and ecclesiastical boundaries to serve as leaders of religious communities, writers, preachers, and teachers. Through the use of primary-source documents such as sermons, memoirs, music, and devotional and theological writings, students will discover the significant contributions women have made to the work and witness of the Christian church.

      HIST201/Lecture/R – History of Christianity II | Credits 3.00 
      The purposes of the course are to provide the student with basic knowledge of the history of Christianity since the time of the Reformation, to enable the student to develop skills in historical method and explanation, and to assess the past for the present work of ministry. The aim is also to stimulate a historical consciousness and an appreciation of the church as a historical community. The course provides a preparation for electives in this field and for continuing education in history. Emphasis is placed on American Christianity, the missionary movement, and the ecumenical movement.

      HIST205/Lecture/R – Reading the Christian Body | Credits 3.00 
      This course analyzes how bodies (human, divine, and demonic) functioned in the development of Christian traditions. Bodies were important locations for meaning-making, interpretation, and communal formation in early Christian discourse. Beginning with medical and philosophical understandings of the body inherited from Graeco-Roman and Jewish communities, students will explore how understandings of the body deeply informed Christian views of daily life and liturgical practices, Christology, resurrection, the poor and ill, ethnicity and gender, and the universal Church. Requirements: HST 101 or permission from instructor.

      LANG210/Lecture/R – Elementary Biblical Hebrew II | Credits 3.00 
      The second term of a year-long study of Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, beginning with elementary forms and moving into the reading of simple prose texts in the Hebrew Bible.

      LANG220/Lecture/R – Elementary Biblical Greek II | Credits 3.00 
      The second term of a year-long course introducing the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of New Testament Greek. In this half of the course, students begin translating texts from the New Testament.

      PRAW125/Lecture/R-A – UPSem Choir | Credits 0.75 
      Through participation in choir students will become familiar with a wide range of music appropriate for worship. They will plan and present programs that coordinate liturgy and music.

      PRAW206/Lecture-Preach/Worsh/R – Sacraments: Theology & Practice | Credits 3.00 
      This course explores the history and theology of Baptism and Eucharist with special attention to biblical and historical documents as well as recent ecumenical developments and ethical implications. In addition, the course will provide opportunities to develop presiding skills and provide practical theological application to the place of the sacraments in congregational life.

      PRAW301/Lecture-Preach/Worsh/R – Clinical Preaching Program I | Credits 3.00 
      The UPSem Clinical Preaching Program provides students with a unique immersion experience in the practice of preaching. The UPSem CPP parallels a Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) experience, but with a concentrated emphasis on preaching rather than pastoral care. Utilizing clinical preaching sites (ordinarily, congregations), mentoring practitioners, lay congregational committees, selected readings, sermon analysis, and peer groups, students will engage in sustained reflection on their preaching experiences throughout the program. Students will earn 3 credit hours each term (6 total hours), with the expectation that students will complete both the Fall and Spring terms. Prerequisites: Parish-based Supervised Ministry and PRAW201.

      PRMN110/Lecture/R – Presbyterian Polity | Credits 3.00 
      This course is designed for students who plan to serve as ordained ministers in the Presbyterian Church (USA). Polity and administration are integral to functioning effectively as a pastor, both in the local congregation and throughout the governing bodies of the church. This course deals with the biblical, historical, and theological bases of church polity and administration, as well as theoretical and practical dimensions. Particular emphasis is placed upon governance and worship issues related to preparation for the ordination examinations in church polity and the sacraments.

      SVMN101/Lecture/R – Supervised Ministry Internship I | Credits 3.00 
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship I. Non-Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission. Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SVMN201/Lecture/R – Supervised Ministry Internship II | Credits 3.00 
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship II. Non-Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Non-Parish Internship I Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Parish Internship I

      THEO201/Lecture/R – Theology II | Credits 3.00 
      The purpose of this course is to explore the doctrines of christology, the Christian life (regeneration, justification, sanctification), ecclesiology, and eschatology. We will concentrate on classical Reformed statements of these doctrines as well as more recent statements. The goal is to obtain a background in systematic theology suitable for parish ministers.

      THEO210/Lecture/R – Readings in the Theology of Augustine | Credits 3.00 
      This seminar offers the opportunity to read with care selected theological treatises by this great foundational theologian for Western Christianity. We will trace the development of Augustine’s thought from his conversion, through his controversial exchanges with the Manicheans, the Pelagians, and the Donatists. Requirements include weekly reflection papers and a final term paper. Prerequisite: THEO101 or THEO201

  • Charlotte Campus

    • BIBL210/Lecture/C – Old Testament II: Prophets & Writings | Credits 3.00 
      This course introduces the Prophets and the Writings of the Old Testament in English translation. Attention is given to the content, history, and theology of prophecy and prophetic literature in Israel, along with the varied works that comprise the Writings. Seminar sessions designed to enable students to develop their exegetical and teaching skills complement lectures and assigned readings in which current biblical scholarship is presented. Consideration will be devoted to the significance of this literature for the work of the church today.

      BIBL301/Lecture/C – Old Testament II: Prophets & Writings | Credits 3.00
      This course introduces the Prophets and the Writings and provides practice in the exegesis of texts in the Hebrew Bible. Primary concentration is on the texts of the English and Hebrew Bibles, although secondary literature is used as a resource. Attention is given to the content, history, and theology of prophecy and prophetic literature in Israel, along with the varied works that comprise the Writings. Consideration will be devoted to the significance of this literature for the work of the church today.

      CITW199/Lecture-CWCom Engage/C – Church in the World Internship | Credits 3.00 
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “community engagement” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      CITW304/Lecture-CWCom Engage/C – Preaching from the Prophets | Credits 3.00 
      This course will provide students with a deeper exposure to the power of the Hebrew prophets and will explore ways to appropriate that power in preaching and worship today. Students will engage in exegetical study of texts in the original language, prepare worship services, and deliver sermons grounded in these materials. Students will also read and critique sermons from various prophetic voices in this country and around the world. Prerequisites: Old Testament I, Old Testament II, and PRAW201.

      CPE100/Lecture-CWInterfaith/C – Clinical Pastoral Education I | Credits 3.00 
      CPE100 Clinical Pastoral Education I requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff.

      CPE101/Lecture/C – Clinical Pastoral Education II | Credits 3.00 
      CPE101 Clinical Pastoral Education II requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff. Prerequisite: CPE100.

      HIST201/Lecture/C – History of Christianity II | Credits 3.00 
      The purposes of the course are to provide the student with basic knowledge of the history of Christianity since the time of the Reformation, to enable the student to develop skills in historical method and explanation, and to assess the past for the present work of ministry. The aim is also to stimulate a historical consciousness and an appreciation of the church as a historical community. The course provides a preparation for electives in this field and for continuing education in history. Emphasis is placed on American Christianity, the missionary movement, and the ecumenical movement.

      PRAW201/Lecture/C – Introduction to Preaching & Worship | Credits 3.00 
      This basic introductory course draws upon biblical and traditional resources in helping students understand the theology of proclamation and worship. Students learn to plan worship services and to prepare and present sermons, and they serve as evaluators and colleagues to one another.

      SVMN101/Lecture/C – Supervised Ministry Internship I | Credits 3.00 
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship I. Non-Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission. Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SVMN201/Lecture/C – Supervised Ministry Internship II | Credits 3.00 
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship II. Non-Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Non-Parish Internship I Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Parish Internship I

       

  • Blended Learning Program (BLP)

    • BIBL105/Lecture/H – Women in the Biblical World Credits 3.00 
      This class is appropriate for both M.A. and M.Div. Students. How do biblical texts represent and refract the lives and experiences of women in ancient Jewish and Christian communities? This course will examine the image and the reality of women in the biblical world by attending to literary presentation, historical reconstruction, and the history of interpretation.

      EDPR130/Lecture-CWCom Engage/B – Community Engaged Teaching & Learning | Credits 3.00 
      Community engagement is a regular part of educational ministries in the 21st century. This course explores best practices (informed by research) that help Christian educators engage in community partnerships that deepen faith and address community-identified needs. Students will engage in a community project during the on-campus session. ry.

      SVMN101/Lecture/B – Supervised Ministry Internship I | Credits 3.00 
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship I. Non-Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission. Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SVMN201/Lecture/B – Supervised Ministry Internship II | Credits 3.00 
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship II. Non-Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Non-Parish Internship I Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Parish Internship I


May 2018

  • Richmond Campus

    • CITW105/Lecture-CWEvangelism/R – Evangelism in the City | Credits 3.00 
      Whether a congregation wishes to reach new people or a team explores a new worshiping community or church plant, a critical step is understanding the context into which God is calling us. This involves the exegesis of cities, neighborhoods, communities, and people. This course will introduce students to the practice of cultural exegesis and give them opportunities to apply it as we explore Richmond together. We will also engage in a critical reading of Timothy Keller’s Center Church as a way to think about the broader tasks of evangelism, especially in urban contexts.

      CITW160/Lecture-CWCom Engage/R – NT & Contemporary Ethical Challenges | Credits3.00
      Contemporary ethical debates among Christians regularly draw upon the New Testament but do so in widely divergent ways and in support of contrary moral proposals. How may appropriate and constructive appeal be made to New Testament texts in relation to these debates? This course will explore the question with special attention to such concerns as sexuality, marriage, and family; the interaction of religious commitment and the public sphere/politics; economic justice; and relation to diverse others. Texts will be selected for study from the gospels, the letters of Paul, the general letters, and Revelation. In addition to a classroom-based component with assigned readings, lectures, discussion, and student presentations, an experiential component will offer students the opportunity (1) to participate in a community agency or conduct field-based research on local ministries that engage contemporary moral concerns; and (2) to reflect on that experiential learning in the light of the New Testament witness, and vice versa. This course, designed to meet the Community Engagement requirement within the Church and World segment of the M.Div. and M.A.C.E. curricula, is open without prerequisite to students in all UPSem degree programs.

      EDEL105/Lecture/R – Arts, Recreation, & Worship Conference | Credits 3.00
      Held in conjunction with The Arts, Recreation, and Worship Conference at Montreat, North Carolina, this course is [will be] an experiential study of current trends and practices in recreational ministry. The course begins with attendance at the Arts, Recreation, and Worship Conference, followed by a time on the Richmond campus for class sharing. The on-campus daily schedule and sharing will be designed collaboratively upon return to UPSem. For information about ARW, please go to www.recreationworkshop.org. Please note that students must register during the UPSem May registration period, and also register with ARW. There are partial and full scholarships available. The ARW registration deadline for scholarships is March 1. Once you have registered at UPSem through Self Service and at Montreat and applied for the ARW scholarship, if you are interested in additional financial aid to attend the event, contact April Swofford, aswofford@upsem.edu. Failure to register at both places will jeopardize course participation.

      EDPR210/Lecture/R – Teaching the Bible | Credits 3.00 
      This interdisciplinary course examines selected approaches to Bible teaching from the perspectives of biblical scholarship and Christian education.

      ETHC111/411/Lecture/R – Ethical Matters of Life & Death | Credits 3.00 
      Using a case study method that acknowledges both the complexities of ethical issues and the variety of directions from which they can be approached, this seminar explores the use of tradition, sacred texts, reason, experience, and revelation in helping people of faith respond to practical, real-life dilemmas.

      HIST107/Lecture/R – History of Christianity in Africa | Credits 3.00 
      The course will focus on the history of the Christian church in Africa from apostolic times to the present. Particular attention will be given to North African Christianity in antiquity, Roman Catholic missionary expansion into sub-Saharan Africa during the Age of Discovery and afterward, Western Protestant efforts to evangelize Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and the diverse range of theological expression encountered in African Christianity today.

      PRMN105/Lecture/R – Working with Groups in the Church | Credits 3.00 
      This course examines four different theories of group dynamics and three different understandings of the church. The purpose of the course is to alert future pastors to the variety of group settings in which pastors are asked to lead and participate.

      TRAV105/Lecture-CWInterfaith/R – Middle East Travel Seminar | Credits 3.00 
      This seminar is conducted on tour (20-23 days) in the Middle East. Included are visits to museums and important archeological sites belonging to the world of biblical antiquity in Jordan, Israel, and the West Bank. Opportunity is given to observe first-hand contemporary manifestations of Islam, Judaism, and Christianity in these lands and to converse with religious and political leaders regarding the quest for peace in this troubled region. There will be fees in addition to the usual tuition fees. For information about student travel subsidies, contact the Academic Dean’s Office.

      TRAV106/Lecture-CWCom Engage/R – Central America Travel Seminar | Credits 3.00 
      This cross-cultural course explores the impact of the gospel in Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Guatemala by visiting Christian communities, meeting with leaders, and studying the history and cultures of Latin American. Enrollment is limited and certain restrictions apply. Students must apply and complete the required orientation and post-trip meetings.

       

  • Charlotte Campus

    • BIBL106/Lecture/C – Perspectives on Jesus | Credits 3.00 
      This course explores a variety of artistic interpretations of Jesus of Nazareth — from early Christian mosaics, to the classical period of painting, sculpture, and music, to contemporary film. Students will analyze theological motifs, educational possibilities, and aesthetic dimensions of works presented in class.

      CITW102/Lecture-CWEvangelism/C – Intro to Christian Mission & Evangelism | Credits3.00 
      This course will serve as an introduction to the study of Christian evangelism, set within the broader context of Missiology. The course will explore the biblical and theological foundations of evangelism, as well as modern historical paradigms and shifts in mission discourse. A primary focus of the course will be the broad study of the mission and evangelism from the twentieth century, including the challenges raised by global shifts in Christianity; Missio Dei and the impact on mission discourse/praxis in the midst of church-world debate; the rise of critical post-colonial methodologies and liberation voices; exploring the relationship between salvation, liberation, and humanisation; and evangelism in the midst of religious pluralism. In order to satisfy the rubrics of the Church in the World component of Union Presbyterian Seminary, students will participate with currently established evangelistic ministry in their local community. Through such participation, students will learn about the development of the evangelistic ministry, its primary goals, how these goals are achieved and evaluated, and the challenges the ministry faces in achieving goals. Students will be required to critically reflect on this experience (through both written and oral presentation assignments) in light of the broader missiological studies undertaken during the course. Students will also be in ongoing communication with PC(USA) Mission co-workers overseas, examining the theological foundations of a particular evangelistic ministry, and how this is interpreted and implemented in the midst of their particular location and context. Students will be required to present their findings as part of the course assessment.

      CPE100/Lecture-CWInterfaith/C – Clinical Pastoral Education I | Credits 3.00 
      CPE100 Clinical Pastoral Education I requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff.

      CPE101/Lecture/C – Clinical Pastoral Education II | Credits 3.00 
      CPE101 Clinical Pastoral Education II requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff. Prerequisite: CPE100.

      EDEL105/Lecture/C – Arts, Recreation, & Worship Conference | Credits 3.00 
      Held in conjunction with The Arts, Recreation, and Worship Conference at Montreat, North Carolina, this course is [will be] an experiential study of current trends and practices in recreational ministry. The course begins with attendance at the Arts, Recreation, and Worship Conference; the on-campus daily schedule and sharing will be designed collaboratively upon return to UPSem. For information about ARW, please go to www.recreationworkshop.org. Please note that students must register during the UPSem May registration period, and also register with ARW. There are partial and full scholarships available. The ARW registration deadline for scholarships is March 1. Once you have registered at UPSem through Self Service and at Montreat and applied for the ARW scholarship, if you are interested in additional financial aid to attend the event, contact April Swofford, aswofford@upsem.edu. Failure to register at both places will jeopardize course participation.

      SVMN101/Lecture/C – Supervised Ministry Internship I | Credits 3.00 
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship I. Non-Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission. Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SVMN201/Lecture/C – Supervised Ministry Internship II | Credits 3.00 
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship II. Non-Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Non-Parish Internship I Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Parish Internship I.

      TRAV105/Lecture-CWInterfaith/C – Middle East Travel Seminar | Credits 3.00 
      This seminar is conducted on tour (20-23 days) in the Middle East. Included are visits to museums and important archeological sites belonging to the world of biblical antiquity in Jordan, Israel, and the West Bank. Opportunity is given to observe first-hand contemporary manifestations of Islam, Judaism, and Christianity in these lands and to converse with religious and political leaders regarding the quest for peace in this troubled region. There will be fees in addition to the usual tuition fees. For information about student travel subsidies, contact the Academic Dean’s Office.

      TRAV106/Lecture-CWCom Engage/C – Central America Travel Seminar | Credits 3.00 
      This cross-cultural course explores the impact of the gospel in Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and Guatemala by visiting Christian communities, meeting with leaders, and studying the history and cultures of Latin American. Enrollment is limited and certain restrictions apply. Students must apply and complete the required orientation and post-trip meetings.