Class Listing

Summer 2018

  • Richmond Campus

    • CITW199/Lecture-CWCom Engage/R – Church in the World Internship | Credits 3.00
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “community engagement” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      CITW199/Lecture-CWEvangelism/R – Church in the World Internship | Credits 3.00
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “evangelism” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      CITW199/Lecture-CWInterfaith/R – Church in the World Internship | Credits 3.00
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “interfaith” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      CPE201/Lecture/R – Clinical Pastoral Education I & II | Credits 6.00
      CPE201 Clinical Pastoral Education I & II requires at least 400 hours at an approved CPE center and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff.

      LANG110/Lecture/R – Elementary Biblical Hebrew I | Credits 3.00
      The first term of a year-long study of Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, beginning with elementary forms and moving into the reading of simple prose texts in the Hebrew Bible.

      LANG210/Lecture/R – Elementary Biblical Hebrew II | Credits 3.00
      The second term of a year-long study of Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, beginning with elementary forms and moving into the reading of simple prose texts in the Hebrew Bible.

      SVMN101/Lecture/R – Supervised Ministry Internship I | Credits 3.00
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship I. Non-Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission. Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SVMN201/Lecture/R – Supervised Ministry Internship II | Credits 3.00
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship II. Non-Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Non-Parish Internship I Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Parish Internship I

Fall 2018

  • Richmond Campus

    • BIBL108/Lecture/R – The Bible from the Underside Credits 3.00 
      Open to all master’s level students.The Bible is the property of the whole church, and each reading community within the church offers insights that deepen and broaden the church’s vision of God and God’s work in the world. This course surveys recent biblical scholarship emerging from liberation communities in the United States and around the globe. Special attention is given to Latin American, African, Asian, feminist, and African American voices.

      BIBL110/Lecture/R – Old Test I: Pentateuch & Former Prophets | Credits 3.00
      This course provides an orientation to historical, critical, and theological study of the Old Testament. Primary attention is given in lectures, assigned readings, and discussions to foundational texts and theological themes of the Torah or Pentateuch (the first five books of the Bible) and the Former Prophets (the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings). Exegetical methods and research skills based on the English text are developed in seminar sessions designed to equip the student to become a responsible and effective interpreter of scripture.

      BIBL120/Lecture/R – New Testament I: Gospels & Acts | Credits 3.00
      This course introduces students to the four canonical Gospels and the Acts of the Apostles, the cultural environment in which they arose, and appropriate methods for interpreting them in English translation. The course explores the historical setting, literary features, theological message, and contemporary significance of each Gospel and of the narrative of Acts. Attention is also given to the challenge of constructing the historical career of Jesus. Throughout the course, students will have opportunity to develop mastery of methods of contemporary Gospel investigation and exegesis, and to consider ways in which exegetical study can inform and enrich the ministries of the church.

      BIBL202/Lecture/R – New Testament I: Gospels & Acts | Credits 3.00
      Prerequisite: Elementary Biblical Greek I and II, or equivalent. This course introduces students to the four canonical Gospels and the Acts of the Apostles, the cultural environment in which they arose, and appropriate methods for interpreting them. The course explores the historical setting, literary features, theological message, and contemporary significance of each Gospel and of the narrative of Acts. Attention is also given to the challenge of constructing the historical career of Jesus. Throughout the course, students will have opportunity to develop mastery of methods of contemporary Gospel investigation and exegesis, drawing upon knowledge of biblical Greek, and to consider ways in which exegetical study can inform and enrich the ministries of the church.

      BIBL123/Lecture/R – Fourth Gospel | Credits 3.00
      Open to all master’s level students. A study of the Fourth Gospel’s distinctive portrait of Jesus and understanding of salvation. Special attention is given to the historical origins and theology of this Gospel and to its literary design.

      CITW107/Lecture-CWEvangelism/R – Entrepreneurial Ministry | Credits 3.00
      Year after year, there are considerably more seminary graduates than open positions for pastors and educators in existing churches or ministries. At the same time, the needs of our rapidly changing world call for creative and adaptive forms of ministry. This course will equip students to create new ministries from scratch or within existing ministry contexts. We will study entrepreneurial skills from a variety of fields and explore exemplars of entrepreneurial ministry in areas such as new worshipping communities and non-profit leadership. A final project in entrepreneurial evangelism will provide an opportunity for practical experience and reflection.

      CITW199/Lecture-CWCom Engage/R – Church in the World Internship | Credits 3.00
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “community engagement” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      CITW199/Lecture-CWEvangelism/R – Church in the World Internship | Credits 3.00
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “evangelism” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      CITW199/Lecture-CWInterfaith/R – Church in the World Internship | Credits 3.00
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “interfaith” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      CITW208/Lecture/R – Proclaim Justice/Church & Public Square | Credits 3.00
      In this course we will consider how various interdisciplinary partners might inform a homiletical theology oriented to justice. In theory and practice, students will explore what has traditionally been called “prophetic preaching” for Christian ethical witness inside the church as well as in the public square. By examining a number of current issues through a homiletical lens, students will reflect on how their practices of proclamation might establish an energizing vision of God’s justice for such a time as this. Church in the World Community Engagement

      CPE100/Lecture-CWInterfaith/R – Clinical Pastoral Education I | Credits 3.00
      CPE100 Clinical Pastoral Education I requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff.

      CPE201/Lecture/R – Clinical Pastoral Education I & II | Credits 6.00
      CPE201 Clinical Pastoral Education I & II requires at least 400 hours at an approved CPE center and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff.

      EDPR110/Lecture/R – Curriculum/Resources for Christian Ed | Credits 3.00
      This course familiarizes students with the wide range of curriculum resources available, involves them in evaluation of these resources, helps them select resources for different church programs, and introduces them to ways of doing curriculum design. These skills for ministry are set in the framework of curriculum theory and history.

      HIST101/Lecture/R – History of Christianity I | Credits 3.00
      This course is a survey of the history of Christianity from the second century through the sixteenth century. The purpose is to familiarize students with basic developments in doctrine and institutional life from the age of the early apologists through the time of the Reformers. Considerable attention is given to primary sources so that students have an opportunity to become acquainted with the literature characteristic of the period being studied.

      LANG110/Lecture/R – Elementary Biblical Hebrew I | Credits 3.00
      The first term of a year-long study of Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, beginning with elementary forms and moving into the reading of simple prose texts in the Hebrew Bible.

      LANG120/Lecture/R – Elementary Biblical Greek I | Credits 3.00
      The first term of a year-long course introducing the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of New Testament Greek.

      MISS108/Lecture/H – Mission&Missionaries/Film&Fiction | Credits 3.00
      This course is an opportunity to examine how Christian mission has been understood and depicted in the modern period. Students will become acquainted with a wide variety of creative works in which some form of cross-cultural mission is featured, while also engaging a selection of scholarly interpretive materials. Western and non-Western points of view on the subject of mission will be considered, as critical issues of evangelism, religious change, intercultural encounter, and interfaith relations arise in the context of different visual and literary cultural expressions. Through this course, students will be introduced to the academic field of missiology.

      PCAC101/Lecture/R – Introduction to Pastoral Care | Credits 3.00
      In any form of ministry, the pastor faces multiple demands for help in situations of death, divorce, aging, reactions to job stress, and more. This course introduces the student to basic resources that are available to assist in the ministry of pastoral care, provides an opportunity to develop pastoral skills in a clinical setting, and encourages students to begin the process of integrating theory and practice into a sense of pastoral identity.

      PRAW125/Lecture/R-A – UPSem Choir | Credits 0.75
      Through participation in choir students will become familiar with a wide range of music appropriate for worship. They will plan and present programs that coordinate liturgy and music. Choir meeting times will be determined by the instructor in conjunction with students’ schedules.

      PRAW208/Lecture/R – Proclaim Justice/Church & Public Square | Credits 3.00
      In this course we will consider how various interdisciplinary partners might inform a homiletical theology oriented to justice. In theory and practice, students will explore what has traditionally been called “prophetic preaching” for Christian ethical witness inside the church as well as in the public square. By examining a number of current issues through a homiletical lens, students will reflect on how their practices of proclamation might establish an energizing vision of God’s justice for such a time as this. Preaching & Worship Elective

      PRMN106/Lecture/R – Landscape of Religious Leadership | Credits 3.00
      What does it mean to be a religious leader? How do the Bible, theology, history, and liturgy shape an appropriate understanding of the nature, purpose, and practice of religious leadership? Using these frameworks, as well as contemporary writings on leadership, this seminar will assist students in understanding better the opportunities and challenges facing religious leaders in a changing church and world. Considerable attention will also be given to congregational dynamics, conflict management, the transition from seminary to first call, and how to care for self and others in appropriate ways as an important part of being a religious leader.

      SVCE101/Lecture/R – Christian Education Internship I | Credits 3.00
      First half of education-focused internship (for MACE & Dual Degree students only).

      SVMN101/Lecture/R – Supervised Ministry Internship I | Credits 3.00
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship I. Non-Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission. Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SVMN201/Lecture/R – Supervised Ministry Internship II | Credits 3.00
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship II. Non-Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Non-Parish Internship I Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Parish Internship I

      THEO101/Lecture/R – Theology I | Credits 3.00
      The purpose of this course is to gain an introductory knowledge of the doctrines of revelation, God, and humanity and their systematic interrelations. We concentrate on the development of doctrine in the early creeds and classical reformed statements, as well as in recent constructive works. The general goal is to obtain a background and preparation suitable for the constructive task in theology for parish ministers.

      THEO127/Lecture/R – Trauma & Transfigured Christian Faith Credits 3.00 
      Traumatic stories must be reframed as we gain new understandings of God’s presence in a broken world. By availing ourselves to the transfigured Christian faith cultivated in the context of marginalized existence, we will examine the mass experience of loss, longing, chronic mourning, and pain. Using the voices of contemporary theologians who confront the questions of where is God in the suffering, injustice, and violence, seminarians will investigate theological perspectives relevant to the redeeming power of God’s grace.

      THM401/Lecture/R – ThM Seminar I | Credits 3.00
      This interdisciplinary colloquium explores the question of how we know and various aspects of beginning a quest for knowledge and wisdom. Specific attention will be given to how these quests are imagined and shaped by various theological disciplines and the “ultimate questions” raised. 3 credit hours.

  • Charlotte Campus

    • BIBL107/Lecture/C – Survey of the Bible & Its Theologies | Credits 3.00
      This course provides an opportunity for the student to acquire a detailed knowledge of the contents of the Bible through homework assignments and in-class tests. Class lectures deal with the overarching motifs and theological structures of the Bible, as well as with the theology of separate biblical books. The English texts will be used as the basis for homework assignments and in-class tests. Class lectures will include selected references to the original languages of the texts. Prior knowledge of Biblical Hebrew and New Testament Greek may prove helpful, but is not required.

      BIBL120/202 Lecture/C – New Testament I: Gospels & Acts | Credits 3.00
      This course introduces students to the four canonical Gospels and the A33cts of the Apostles, the cultural environment in which they arose, and appropriate methods for interpreting them in English translation. The course explores the historical setting, literary features, theological message, and contemporary significance of each Gospel and of the narrative of Acts. Attention is also given to the challenge of constructing the historical career of Jesus. Throughout the course, students will have an opportunity to develop mastery of methods of contemporary Gospel investigation and exegesis, and to consider ways in which exegetical study can inform and enrich the ministries of the church.

      CITW130/Lecture-CWInterfaith/C – Christian Encounter with World Religions | Credits 3.00
      There is little within contemporary discourse more contentious and theologically challenging than religious pluralism. Often fraught with prejudice and conflict, the encounter of people from different religious faiths also provides valuable opportunities for critical reflection, understanding, and respect. Given the reality of religious pluralism within both a global and local context, this course will allow students to critically reflect on key issues arising from the encounter of Christians with people of different faith traditions. Identifying central teachings of major world religions, including Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism and Judaism, we will examine the potential benefits and challenges of inter-religious encounter for Christian ministry in a local context.

      CITW166/Lecture-CWCom Engage/H – Pastoral Care Toward the End of Life | Credits 3.00
      This course will examine issues that pertain to the aging process as individuals near the end of life. It will focus on pastoral care for the individuals and their family caregivers who face a different set of struggles as they attempt to provide adequate care for loved ones and take care of themselves and their nuclear families. Students will be expected to make weekly visits with a minimum of two elders and report on those visits. Students will also be expected to interview a medical or mental health professional who works with the aging and at least one family caregiver. Issues that will be studied include: dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, physical loss, loss of independence, and compassion fatigue. Each student will be expected to research a specific medical/psychological condition related to aging and present a case study based upon their findings.

      CITW199/Lecture-CWCom Engage/C – Church in the World Internship | Credits 3.00
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “community engagement” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      CPE100/Lecture/C – Clinical Pastoral Education I | Credits 3.00
      CPE100 Clinical Pastoral Education I requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff.

      CPE101/Lecture/C – Clinical Pastoral Education II | Credits 3.00
      CPE101 Clinical Pastoral Education II requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff. Prerequisite: CPE100.

      EDPR120/Lecture/C – The Christian Life | Credits 3.00
      Through study and practice, this course introduces students to Christian devotion, prayer, worship, and spiritual disciplines. This course fosters personal spiritual growth and equips the educator to be a resource for spiritual development in the congregation.

      FTHF140/Lecture/H – Faith & Human Development | Credits 3.00
      This course explores historical and contemporary theories of human psychology and faith across the lifespan, with particular attention to how these theories shape teaching and learning among all ages in the church.

      HIST101/Lecture/C – History of Christianity I | Credits 3.00
      This course is a survey of the history of Christianity from the second century through the sixteenth century. The purpose is to familiarize students with basic developments in doctrine and institutional life from the age of the early apologists through the time of the Reformers. Considerable attention is given to primary sources so that students have an opportunity to become acquainted with the literature characteristic of the period being studied.

      PRAW205/Lecture-Preach/Worsh/C – The Christian Year | Credits 3.00
      The foundation of the Christian Year is Sunday — the Lord’s Day. What is essential to Lord’s Day worship? How does the lectionary shape the liturgical themes of each season? What about Ash Wednesday? Holy Week? Services for Wholeness? All Saints? We will look at these questions historically and theologically, but also with an emphasis on learning specific skills necessary for those who will preside at the Lord’s Supper, baptize, confirm, preach, and lead worship on Sundays and other occasions of the Christian Year.

      SVMN101/Lecture/C – Supervised Ministry Internship I | Credits 3.00
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship I. Non-Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission. Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SVMN201/Lecture/C – Supervised Ministry Internship II | Credits 3.00
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship II. Non-Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Non-Parish Internship I Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Parish Internship I

      THEO101/Lecture/R – Theology I | Credits 3.00
      The purpose of this course is to gain an introductory knowledge of the doctrines of revelation, God, and humanity and their systematic interrelations. We concentrate on the development of doctrine in the early creeds and classical reformed statements, as well as in recent constructive works. The general goal is to obtain a background and preparation suitable for the constructive task in theology for parish ministers.

  • Blended Learning Program (BLP)

    • FTHF120/Lecture/B – Adult Religious Education | Credits 3.00
      This course reviews the events and dynamics of adult life (age 18-death) as a basis for practical strategies to implement Christian education in the local church. Areas of emphasis include adult learning styles, assessment of curricula and resources for adult education, spiritual development in adulthood, and specific issues such as love, work, family, power and freedom, intimacy, and loss.

      SVCE101/Lecture/B – Christian Education Internship I | Credits 3.00
      First half of education-focused internship (for MACE & Dual Degree students only).

      SVMN101/Lecture/B – Supervised Ministry Internship I | Credits 3.00
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship I. Non-Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission. Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SVMN201/Lecture/B – Supervised Ministry Internship II | Credits 3.00
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship II. Non-Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Non-Parish Internship I Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Parish Internship I

      THEO101/Lecture/B – Theology I | Credits 3.00
      The purpose of this course is to gain an introductory knowledge of the doctrines of revelation, God, and humanity and their systematic interrelations. We concentrate on the development of doctrine in the early creeds and classical reformed statements, as well as in recent constructive works. The general goal is to obtain a background and preparation suitable for the constructive task in theology for parish ministers.


January 2019 (Travel Term)

  • Richmond Campus

    • TRAV109/Lecture-CWInterfaith/R – India Travel Seminar | Credits 3.00
      This seminar will introduce students to the rich practice of Christianity in India, past and present. While traveling in India, students will also gain exposure to the diversity of Indian culture. Included are lectures by prominent scholars (Christian and non-Christian) as well as visits to museums, churches, mosques, Hindu temples, NGOs, and a social justice advocacy organization. Students will be in residence at United Theological College, the largest seminary in India. Opportunities will be given to observe contemporary manifestations of Christianity, Hinduism, and Islam in this part of the world and to converse with religious and other leaders in the region. Attention will be given to the issue of Christianity and caste, especially as this relates to women and children.

  • Charlotte Campus

    • TRAV109/Lecture-CWInterfaith/C – India Travel Seminar | Credits 3.00
      This seminar will introduce students to the rich practice of Christianity in India, past and present. While traveling in India, students will also gain exposure to the diversity of Indian culture. Included are lectures by prominent scholars (Christian and non-Christian) as well as visits to museums, churches, mosques, Hindu temples, NGOs, and a social justice advocacy organization. Students will be in residence at United Theological College, the largest seminary in India. Opportunities will be given to observe contemporary manifestations of Christianity, Hinduism, and Islam in this part of the world and to converse with religious and other leaders in the region. Attention will be given to the issue of Christianity and caste, especially as this relates to women and children.


Spring 2019

  • Richmond Campus

    • BIBL107/Lecture/R – Survey of the Bible & Its Theologies | Credits 3.00
      This course provides an opportunity for the student to acquire a detailed knowledge of the contents of the Bible through homework assignments and in-class tests. Class lectures deal with the overarching motifs and theological structures of the Bible, as well as with the theology of separate biblical books. The English texts will be used as the basis for homework assignments and in-class tests. Class lectures will include selected references to the original languages of the texts. Prior knowledge of Biblical Hebrew and New Testament Greek may prove helpful, but is not required.

      BIBL113/Lecture/R – Made in the Image & Imagination of God | Credits 3.00
      “God and the Imagination are One” (Wallace Stevens, “Final Soliloquy of the Interior Paramour”) The biblical affirmation that human beings are created in the image of God (imago dei; Gen 1:26) calls attention to the extraordinary importance of human beings as representatives of God. Often lost in the canonical discussion, however, is the vital role imagination plays in the self-awareness of both God and human beings. This course will place biblical and theological concepts of the imago dei into conversation with the intellectual history of imagination. From Hume to Kant, to Coleridge and Wordsworth and Stevens, from contemporary philosophers and evolutionary biologists to the second shift employees sitting on a church pew on any given Sunday, imagination has played an iconic role in shaping global politics, economics, and religion. What does it mean for God to imagine human beings into existence with capacities to live, learn, and care for one another? What does it mean for human beings to be living forms of such divine imagination (cf. D. Hedley)? More importantly, how might a failure of the imagination – on God’s part or ours – put at risk the primordial hopes and expectations for a “very good” world? No prerequisites.

      BIBL210/Lecture/R – Old Testament II: Prophets & Writings | Credits 3.00
      This course introduces the Prophets and the Writings of the Old Testament in English translation. Attention is given to the content, history, and theology of prophecy and prophetic literature in Israel, along with the varied works that comprise the Writings. Seminar sessions designed to enable students to develop their exegetical and teaching skills complement lectures and assigned readings in which current biblical scholarship is presented. Consideration will be devoted to the significance of this literature for the work of the church today.

      BIBL301/Lecture/R – Old Testament II: Prophets & Writings | Credits 3.00
      This course introduces the Prophets and the Writings and provides practice in the exegesis of texts in the Hebrew Bible. Primary concentration is on the texts of the English and Hebrew Bibles, although secondary literature is used as a resource. Attention is given to the content, history, and theology of prophecy and prophetic literature in Israel, along with the varied works that comprise the Writings. Consideration will be devoted to the significance of this literature for the work of the church today.

      BIBL211/Lecture/R – The Gospel of Mark | Credits 3.00
      Prerequisite: BIBL120 or BIBL202. This elective introduces students to Mak’s gospel by means of a close exegetical and theological reading of the text. Significant attention will be given to Mark’s Christology, the messianic secret, apocalyptic motifs, and his understanding of discipleship. Students will also explore ways to preach and embody the text in the life of the church.

      BIBL220/Lecture/R – New Testament II: Epistles & Apocalypse | Credits 3.00
      This course focuses on the letters of Paul, but also introduces the general epistles and Revelation. Close reading of the Pauline epistles highlights Paul’s cultural world, the particular situations that prompted him to write these letters, and his theological vision. Reading of selected general epistles and the Book of Revelation opens up interpretive issues raised by these writings. Through lectures, seminar and small-group discussion, and papers, students explore the theological message of New Testament texts, strengthen exegetical skills, and draw connections between these first-century texts and the work of the church today.

      BIBL302/Lecture/R – New Testament II: Epistles & Apocalypse | Credits 3.00
      This course focuses on the letters of Paul, but also introduces the general epistles and Revelation. Close reading of the Pauline epistles highlights Paul’s cultural world, the particular situations that prompted him to write these letters, and his theological vision. Reading of selected general epistles and the Book of Revelation opens up interpretive issues raised by these writings. Through lectures, seminar and small-group discussion, and papers, students explore the theological message of New Testament texts, strengthen exegetical skills, and draw connections between these first-century texts and the work of the church today.

      CITW175/Lecture-CWCom Engage/R – Theology & the Politics of Food | Credits 3.00
      This course explores the theological and ethical implications entailed in the production, distribution, preparation, and consumption of food. Although eating is one of the most basic acts of biological self]preservation, it is something many North American Christians do not think about systematically in relation to their faith. If these questions rise to the level of consciousness at all, they are often reduced to the impulse towards charity for those who are hungry. This is certainly a good start. But there are many deeper theological questions involved in this most basic of human needs. How are we to understand ourselves in relation to the other creatures involved in the food chain? What does it say about creation itself that life can only be sustained through the death of other living things? What can we learn about ourselves from hunger and from our cravings? Is it possible to commit sin in the way we eat? How so and why? And are there practices, such as the ancient practice of fasting, which could helpfully encourage a deeper sense of gliving to Godh in our eating? We will explore these and many other questions through readings in scripture, theology, ethics, and empirical studies of the food production system in the United States. Our goal will be to gain a deeper understanding of the way in which this everyday practice can be a site for the exercise of Christian faith and responsibility.

      CITW199/Lecture-CWCom Engage/R – Church in the World Internship | Credits 3.00
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “community engagement” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      CITW199/Lecture-CWEvangelism/R – Church in the World Internship | Credits 3.00
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “evangelism” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      CITW199/Lecture-CWInterfaith/R – Church in the World Internship | Credits 3.00
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “interfaith” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      EDTH310/Lecture/R – Theory for Education in Religion | Credits 3.00
      This course is an investigation of the moral and religious dimensions of education as expressed in the family, church, school, and society. Selected educational theories and practices will be studied and the students will develop their personal theory of Christian education.

      ETHC101/Lecture/R – Introduction to Christian Ethics | Credits 3.00
      This course introduces the discipline of theological ethics in ways appropriate to the interests of pastors. A range of contemporary proposals are considered and evaluated by reference to the Christian tradition and selected moral problems. Course format includes readings, lectures, seminars, mid-term, and final examinations.

      FTHF111/Lecture-CWInterfaith/R – Nurturing Child/Adolescent Spirituality | Credits 3.00
      This course explores, from international and multi-religious perspectives, the spiritual lives of children and youth and the implications of this cross-cultural discourse for contemporary Christian ministries. We will ask who is responsible for nurturing spirituality, how we cultivate rituals and practices that shape the inner life and encourage ethical action, what our religious ideals of youthful spirituality are, how contemporary cultural dilemmas pose challenges for spiritual nurture, and what rites of passage might mark the spiritual journeys of young people. No prerequisites.

      HIST201/Lecture/R – History of Christianity II | Credits 3.00
      The purposes of the course are to provide the student with basic knowledge of the history of Christianity since the time of the Reformation, to enable the student to develop skills in historical method and explanation, and to assess the past for the present work of ministry. The aim is also to stimulate a historical consciousness and an appreciation of the church as a historical community. The course provides a preparation for electives in this field and for continuing education in history. Emphasis is placed on American Christianity, the missionary movement, and the ecumenical movement.

      LANG210/Lecture/R – Elementary Biblical Hebrew II | Credits 3.00
      The second term of a year-long study of Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, beginning with elementary forms and moving into the reading of simple prose texts in the Hebrew Bible.

      LANG220/Lecture/R – Elementary Biblical Greek II | Credits 3.00
      The second term of a year-long course introducing the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of New Testament Greek. In this half of the course, students begin translating texts from the New Testament.

      PCAC109/Lecture/R – Pastoral Care w/ Couples & Families | Credits 3.00
      How does our theological perspective on human relationships influence our pastoral responses to couples and families in crisis? What do we mean when we say a family is dysfunctional? What, then, is a “healthy” family? Are there elements of our theological views which serve to further alienate those individuals who do not live in traditional nuclear families? This course will provide students with an opportunity to reflect on these questions (and others that they bring to the course) as they study various authors and approaches within the family systems theory literature (e.g., Boyd-Franklin, Friedman, McGoldrick, and Minuchin). Each student will be required to complete a detailed family genogram in order to gain a better self-understanding and competence with this assessment tool. Videotapes of seasoned therapists in live sessions, as well as role playing in small groups, will provide students with an opportunity to improve their caregiving and counseling skills. In addition, the course will consist of readings, lectures, and discussions. A final paper will be required.

      PRAW125/Lecture/R-B – UPSem Choir | Credits 0.75
      Through participation in choir students will become familiar with a wide range of music appropriate for worship. They will plan and present programs that coordinate liturgy and music. Meeting times are based on student and professor schedules; choir meetings are not an excuse for missing another course.

      PRAW201/Lecture/R – Introduction to Preaching & Worship | Credits 3.00
      This basic introductory course draws upon biblical and traditional resources in helping students understand the theology of proclamation and worship. Students learn to plan worship services and to prepare and present sermons, and they serve as evaluators and colleagues to one another.

      PRMN110/Lecture/R – Presbyterian Polity | Credits 3.00
      This course is designed for students who plan to serve as ordained ministers in the Presbyterian Church (USA). Polity and administration are integral to functioning effectively as a pastor, both in the local congregation and throughout the governing bodies of the church. This course deals with the biblical, historical, and theological bases of church polity and administration, as well as theoretical and practical dimensions. Particular emphasis is placed upon governance and worship issues related to preparation for the ordination examinations in church polity and the sacraments.

      PROJ101/Lecture/R – MACE Integrative Project | Credits 3.00

      SVCE201/Lecture/R – Christian Education Internship II | Credits 3.00
      Second half of education-focused internship (for MACE & Dual Degree students only).

      SVMN101/Lecture/R – Supervised Ministry Internship I | Credits 3.00
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship I. Non-Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission. Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SVMN201/Lecture/R – Supervised Ministry Internship II | Credits 3.00
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship II. Non-Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Non-Parish Internship I Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Parish Internship I

      THEO123/Lecture/R – Theological Vision of MLK, Jr. | Credits 3.00
      An exploration of the theological vision of Martin Luther King, Jr., that was foundational to his social criticism and call for social justice in American society. Through close readings of speeches, writings and sermons, students will assess the theological importance of this 20th century American religious leader and thinker. A final paper will be required.

      THEO201/Lecture/R – Theology II | Credits 3.00
      The purpose of this course is to explore the doctrines of christology, the Christian life (regeneration, justification, sanctification), ecclesiology, and eschatology. We will concentrate on classical Reformed statements of these doctrines as well as more recent statements. The goal is to obtain a background in systematic theology suitable for parish ministers.

  • Charlotte Campus

    • BIBL131/Lecture/C – The Bible & Justice Credits 3.00
      One cannot look at the Bible and not see the constant attention that it gives to issues of social justice. From themes of liberation in Exodus to concerns about egalitarianism in the Torah to issues of social justice that are replete in the prophetic books to Jesus’ work on issues of social concern in the Gospels, there is not a section of the biblical corpus that ignores this concern. In this class, we will explore the persistent biblical call for justice and wrestle with the implications of this emphasis for the contemporary church.

      BIBL220/302 Lecture/C – New Testament II: Epistles & Apocalypse | Credits 3.00
      This course focuses on the letters of Paul, but also introduces the general epistles and Revelation. Close reading of the Pauline epistles highlights Paul’s cultural world, the particular situations that prompted him to write these letters, and his theological vision. Reading of selected general epistles and the Book of Revelation opens up interpretive issues raised by these writings. Through lectures, seminar and small-group discussion, and papers, students explore the theological message of New Testament texts, strengthen exegetical skills, and draw connections between these first-century texts and the work of the church today.

      CITW174/Lecture-CWCom Engage/H – Ecology & Worship | Credits 3.00
      This course examines recent studies in eco-theology in order to develop liturgical rites that reflect care for creation and integrate congregational actions in response to issues of environmental care. Students will prepare and lead services that include special attention to the role of sacraments.

      CPE100/Lecture/C – Clinical Pastoral Education I | Credits 3.00
      CPE100 Clinical Pastoral Education I requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff.

      CPE101/Lecture/C – Clinical Pastoral Education II | Credits 3.00
      CPE101 Clinical Pastoral Education II requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff. Prerequisite: CPE100.

      HIST201/Lecture/C – History of Christianity II | Credits 3.00
      The purposes of the course are to provide the student with basic knowledge of the history of Christianity since the time of the Reformation, to enable the student to develop skills in historical method and explanation, and to assess the past for the present work of ministry. The aim is also to stimulate a historical consciousness and an appreciation of the church as a historical community. The course provides a preparation for electives in this field and for continuing education in history. Emphasis is placed on American Christianity, the missionary movement, and the ecumenical movement.

      PRMN110/Lecture/C – Presbyterian Polity | Credits 3.00
      This course is designed for students who plan to serve as ordained ministers in the Presbyterian Church (USA). Polity and administration are integral to functioning effectively as a pastor, both in the local congregation and throughout the governing bodies of the church. This course deals with the biblical, historical, and theological bases of church polity and administration, as well as theoretical and practical dimensions. Particular emphasis is placed upon governance and worship issues related to preparation for the ordination examinations in church polity and the sacraments.

      SVMN201/Lecture/C – Supervised Ministry Internship II | Credits 3.00 
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship II. Non-Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Non-Parish Internship I Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Parish Internship I

      THEO201/Lecture/C – Theology II | Credits 3.00
      The purpose of this course is to explore the doctrines of christology, the Christian life (regeneration, justification, sanctification), ecclesiology, and eschatology. We will concentrate on classical Reformed statements of these doctrines as well as more recent statements. The goal is to obtain a background in systematic theology suitable for parish ministers.

  • Blended Learning Program

    • EDEL106/Lecture-Preach/Worsh/B – Worship, Sacraments, & Education | Credits 3.00
      This course will explore the theology of worship and sacraments, especially from a Reformed perspective, and will consider the relationships between worship, sacraments, and education. Topics include participation in worship for all the baptized, the unity of Word and Table, children and worship, preparation for baptism, and preparation for ordination as deacons and elders. Students will design educational events and engage in demonstration teaching with mutual review and critique.

      EDPR210/Lecture/B – Teaching the Bible | Credits 3.00
      This interdisciplinary course examines selected approaches to Bible teaching from the perspectives of biblical scholarship and Christian education.

      PROJ101/Lecture/B – MACE Integrative Project | Credits 3.00

      SVCE201/Lecture/B – Christian Education Internship II | Credits 3.00
      Second half of education-focused internship (for MACE & Dual Degree students only).

May 2019

  • Richmond Campus

    • CITW106/Lecture-CWEvangelism/R – The Church Growth Movement | Credits 3.00
      The “church growth movement” is often associated with “seeker sensitive” attractional models and slick marketing strategies. While this movement has been influential in evangelical and nondenominational church circles, it has not been widely embraced in mainline Protestantism. Yet many mainline Protestants think of evangelism primarily in terms of church growth. In addition to exploring current examples and critiques of church growth strategies, this course will reconsider the foundational principles of the movement in light of contemporary network theory.

      ETHC112/Lecture/R – Ethics, Ethnicity, & Architectonic Texts | Credits 3.00
      Using the African American religious tradition as a framework, seminarians will explore a variety of art, artifacts and material culture in western Christianity. This rich legacy of visual texts is not only used to expand the perimeters of aesthetics in the work of justice but also tells a “peculiar” history of theological anthropology.

      FTHF130/Lecture/R – Digital Culture & Spirituality | Credits 3.00
      Since social networking, gaming, and other online activities have become major pastimes among many age groups, contemporary experiences of Christian spirituality are significantly shaped by digital culture. This course explores the ways in which constructive theologies and practices of Christian identity, community, and education may evolve in relation to digital ideologies and experiences.

      INTD107/Lecture/R – Cross Examination | Credits 3.00
      This interdisciplinary elective course will examine the cross as the central symbol of Christian faith. It will consider diverse presentations of its meaning and significance in the New Testament and in classical and contemporary theological discourse and debate. It will also attend to presentation of the cross in visual art, and wrestle with the cross as a resource for Christian spirituality, a metaphor for discipleship, and a springboard for the church’s public engagement in the world.

      INTD108/Lecture-Preach/Worsh/R – Preaching & Worship as Pastoral Care | Credits 3.00
      This course will provide students with an opportunity to examine pastoral care issues in light of preaching and worship. Using resources from pastoral theology, homiletics, and liturgics, students will learn to address specific issues (e.g., family crises, occasions in the life cycle, national tragedies, issues in the life of a congregation) in the roles of preacher and presider. Each student will prepare a sermon and a worship service, demonstrating how insights from the course can be applied to a pastoral setting.

      TRAV107/Lecture-CWInterfaith/R – Ghana Travel Seminar | Credits 3.00
      This field course is held in Ghana to study the churches their organization and ministries, and their partnership in mission with other churches. The study is done in collaboration with the Trinity Theological College in Legon near Accra, the Presbyterian Church of Ghana and the Evangelical Presbyterian Church of Ghana. Preparation for travel includes a series of readings and introductory sessions to provide historical, cultural, and theological background. The class documents its findings and reports back to the seminary and supporting churches. Note: Fees in addition to tuition will be charged.

Spring II 2019

  • Charlotte Campus

    • BIBL103/Lecture/C – Genesis | Credits 3.00
      This course mixes exegesis of Hebrew and English pericopes in Genesis with attention to the theological themes of the book. Illustrations from the artistic tradition as well as interpretations by preachers and poets are considered.

      CITW102/Lecture-CWEvangelism/C – Intro to Christian Mission & Evangelism | Credits 3.00
      This course will serve as an introduction to the study of Christian evangelism, set within the broader context of Missiology. The course will explore the biblical and theological foundations of evangelism, as well as modern historical paradigms and shifts in mission discourse. A primary focus of the course will be the broad study of the mission and evangelism from the twentieth century, including the challenges raised by global shifts in Christianity; Missio Dei and the impact on mission discourse/praxis in the midst of church-world debate; the rise of critical post-colonial methodologies and liberation voices; exploring the relationship between salvation, liberation, and humanisation; and evangelism in the midst of religious pluralism. In order to satisfy the rubrics of the Church in the World component of Union Presbyterian Seminary, students will participate withcurrently established evangelistic ministry in their local community. Through such participation, students will learn about the development of the evangelistic ministry, its primary goals, how these goals are achieved and evaluated, and the challenges the ministry faces in achieving goals. Students will be required to critically reflect on this experience (through both written and oral presentation assignments) in light of the broader missiological studies undertaken during the course. Students will also be in ongoing communication with PC(USA) Mission co-workers overseas, examining the theological foundations of a particular evangelistic ministry, and how this is interpreted and implemented in the midst of their particular location and context. Students will be required to present their findings as part of the course assessment.

      CPE100/Lecture-CWInterfaith/C – Clinical Pastoral Education I | Credits 3.00
      CPE100 Clinical Pastoral Education I requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff.

      CPE101/Lecture/C – Clinical Pastoral Education II | Credits 3.00
      CPE101 Clinical Pastoral Education II requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff. Prerequisite: CPE100.

      LANG110/Lecture/C – Elementary Biblical Hebrew I | Credits 3.00
      The first term of a year-long study of Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, beginning with elementary forms and moving into the reading of simple prose texts in the Hebrew Bible.

      LANG210/Lecture/C – Elementary Biblical Hebrew II | Credits 3.00
      The second term of a year-long study of Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, beginning with elementary forms and moving into the reading of simple prose texts in the Hebrew Bible.

      PRAW206/Lecture-Preach/Worsh/C – Sacraments: Theology & Practice | Credits 3.00
      This course explores the history and theology of Baptism and Eucharist with special attention to biblical and historical documents as well as recent ecumenical developments and ethical implications. In addition, the course will provide opportunities to develop presiding skills and provide practical theological application to the place of the sacraments in congregational life.

      PROJ101/Lecture/C – MACE Integrative Project | Credits 3.00

      SVMN101/Lecture/C – Supervised Ministry Internship I | Credits 3.00
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship I. Non-Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission. Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SVMN201/Lecture/C – Supervised Ministry Internship II | Credits 3.00
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship II. Non-Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Non-Parish Internship I Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Parish Internship I

Summer 2019

  • Richmond Campus

    • CPE201/Lecture/R – Clinical Pastoral Education I & II | Credits 6.00 
      CPE201 Clinical Pastoral Education I & II requires at least 400 hours at an approved CPE center and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff.

      LANG120/Lecture/R – Elementary Biblical Greek I | Credits 3.00 
      The first term of a year-long course introducing the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of New Testament Greek.

      LANG220/Lecture/R – Elementary Biblical Greek II | Credits 3.00 
      The second term of a year-long course introducing the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of New Testament Greek. In this half of the course, students begin translating texts from the New Testament.

      SVMN101/Lecture/R – Supervised Ministry Internship I | Credits 3.00
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship I. Non-Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission. Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SVMN201/Lecture/R – Supervised Ministry Internship II | Credits 3.00 
      Either Parish or Non-Parish Internship II. Non-Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Non-Parish Internship I Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Parish Internship I