Class Listing

Fall 2016

  • Richmond Campus

    • BIB 001. Elementary Biblical Hebrew I. 3 Credits.
      The first term of a year-long study of Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, beginning with elementary forms and moving into the reading of simple prose texts in the Hebrew Bible.

      BIB 004. Elementary Biblical Greek I. 3 Credits.
      The first term of a year-long course introducing the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of New Testament Greek.

      BIB 126. The Bible & American Politics. 3 Credits.
      This course will examine the use of Scripture in American political discourse from the colonial period to the present day. Key topics will include the theocratic models of the Puritans, the role of Scripture in the revolutionary period and founding of the nation, the utilization of the biblical texts to justify and oppose slavery, appeals to “Providence” by both sides before and during the Civil War, the hermeneutical strategies of the Social Gospel movement, and the diverse approaches of twentieth-century leaders. We will give particular attention to the interpretive methods of major figures during the civil rights movement, those leaders who propelled the “Religious Right” to prominence, and the place of the Bible in contemporary political discourse, including the presidential election that will take place during the semester. An array of critical approaches will be employed to understand more clearly the place of the Bible in American public life.

      BIB 217. Burden/Blessing of Apocalyptic Theology. 3 Credits.
      It was the best f times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going to heaven, we were all going direct the other way …. — Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities, 1859 Dickens was neither the first nor the last to live the tension between now and then, between the pressing burden of present affliction and the lingering hope for future restoration. Attempts to withstand or resist oppression by discovering hidden truths that generate hope stand at the center of apocalyptic theology. This course will examine the socio-political contexts and the theological visions of apocalyptic literature in the Old and New Testaments (e.g., Isaiah 24-27, 56-66; Zechariah 9-14; Daniel 7-12; Revelation), and in post-biblical Jewish and Christian traditions (e.g., I Enoch; 4 Ezra, Apocalypse of Peter). Special attention will be given to the abiding legacy of apocalyptic theology as manifest in sermons, political rhetoric, music, art, and film.

      BIB 160. Old Testament I (MACE). 3 Credits.
      This course provides an orientation to historical, critical, and theological study of the Old Testament. Primary attention is given in lectures, assigned readings, and discussions to foundational texts and theological themes of the Torah or Pentateuch (the first five books of the Bible) and the Former Prophets (the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings). Exegetical methods and research skills based on the English text are developed in seminar sessions designed to equip the student to become a responsible and effective interpreter of scripture.

      BIB 170. New Testament I (MACE). 3 Credits.
      This course introduces students to the four canonical gospels, the cultural environment in which they arose, and basic methods for interpreting them in English translation. The theological message and contemporary significance of each gospel will be studied with a focus on using sound principles of interpretation in educational settings. Seminar sessions designed to enable students to develop their exegetical and teaching skills complement lectures and assigned readings in which current biblical scholarship is presented.

      BIB 211. Old Testament: Pentatch/Fmr Prophets. 3 Credits.
      This course provides an orientation to historical, critical, and theological study of the literature of the Old Testament. Primary attention is given in lectures and assigned readings to foundational texts and themes, and major issues of interpretation in the canonical divisions of the Pentateuch or Torah (the first five books of the Bible) and the Former Prophets (the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings). Basic resources and procedures for exegesis of the Hebrew texts are introduced through work in seminar sessions, with emphasis placed on development of skills in grammatical analysis, translation, and literary criticism of selected texts.

      BIB 221. New Testament I: Gospels. 3 Credits.
      On the basis of lectures, readings, class discussions, and other projects undertaken in smaller groups, students are introduced to the subject matter of the four canonical gospels, the cultural environment in which they arose, and the basic methodologies for interpreting them. Content and interpretation of the gospels are explored through the Greek text. The emphasis is on mastering methods of contemporary gospel investigation.

      BIB 312. Cultural Interpretations of the New Testament. 3 Credits.
      Prerequisites: one core course in Bible and one core course in theology or ethics. An exploration into how the cultural backgrounds and perspectives of text interpreters influence their conclusions regarding biblical and theological interpretation. The ideology of traditional “Eurocentric” biblical and theological scholarship will be considered alongside an analysis of interpretations rendered by more “marginalized” biblical and theological readings. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the interpretative procedures utilized by U.S. Latinos/as and Hispanics, Asian Americans, African Americans, and womanist and feminist thinkers. Perspectives considered also include those of Nicaraguan peasants, Negro slaves, the disabled, preachers in the contemporary Black church, and theologies emergent from LGBTQ communities. Special consideration will be given to ways in which students may use results from these analyses to broaden their own interpretative horizons.

      BIB 427. Burden/Blessing of Apocalyptic Theology. 3 Credits.
      It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age offoolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going to heaven, we were all going direct the other way …. — Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities, 1859 Dickens was neither the first nor the last to live the tension between now and then, between the pressing burden of present affliction and the lingering hope for future restoration. Attempts to withstand or resist oppression by discovering hidden truths that generate hope stand at the center of apocalyptic theology. This course will examine the socio-political contexts and the theological visions of apocalyptic literature in the Old and New Testaments (e.g., Isaiah 24-27, 56-66; Zechariah 9-14; Daniel 7-12; Revelation), and in post-biblical Jewish and Christian traditions (e.g., I Enoch; 4 Ezra, Apocalypse of Peter). Special attention will be given to the abiding legacy of apocalyptic theology as manifest in sermons, political rhetoric, music, art, and film.

      CPE 100. Clinical Pastoral Education. 3 Credits.
      CPE100 Clinical Pastoral Education I requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff.

      CPE 101. Clinical Pastoral Education II. 3 Credits. CPE101 Clinical Pastoral Education II requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff. Prerequisite: CPE100.

      CPE 201. Clinical Pastoral Education I & II. 6 Credits. CPE201 Clinical Pastoral Education I & II requires at least 400 hours at an approved CPE center and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff.

      EDU 166. The Christian Life. 3 Credits.
      Through study and practice, this course introduces students to Christian devotion, prayer, worship, and spiritual disciplines. This course fosters personal spiritual growth and equips the educator to be a resource for spiritual development in the congregation. (Formerly listed as THE167)

      EDU 263. Theory for Education in Religion. 3 Credits.
      This course is an investigation of the moral and religious dimensions of education as expressed in the family, church, school, and society. Selected educational theories and practices will be studied and the students will develop their personal theory of Christian education.

      HST 101. History of Christianity I. 3 Credits.
      This course is a survey of the history of Christianity from the second century through the sixteenth century. The purpose is to familiarize students with basic developments in doctrine and institutional life from the age of the early apologists through the time of the Reformers. Considerable attention is given to primary sources so that students have an opportunity to become acquainted with the literature characteristic of the period being studied.

      INT 133. Union Presbyterian Seminary Choir. 0.75 Credits.
      Through participation in choir students will become familiar with a wide range of music appropriate for worship. They will plan and present programs that coordinate liturgy and music.

      PRA 103. Preaching & Worship. 3 Credits.
      This basic introductory course draws upon biblical and traditional resources in helping students understand the theology of proclamation and worship. Students learn to plan worship services and to prepare and present sermons, and they serve as evaluators and colleagues to one another.

      PRA 129. Minister as Spiritual Guide. 3 Credits.
      This course is designed to prepare prospective church leaders to engage in the spiritual development of themselves, individual church members, and their congregations. Special emphasis will be placed on Reformed piety and contemporary spiritual disciplines. (formerly The Pastor as Spiritual Guide or Pastoral Care and Spiritual Development)

      PRA 130. Intro to Church Business Administration. 3 Credits.
      Designed for future pastors and Christian educators, this course explores practices of business administration in congregational life, including stewardship, budgeting, financial management, strategic planning, working with church staff and volunteers, legal and tax matters in ministry, information management, and property management. With these topics, attention will be given to theological and ministerial dimensions of church business administration. McFayden. January 2010.

      PRA 144. CWInterfaith – Evangelism in a Multi-Religious World. 3 Credits.
      What does it mean to bear witness to the gospel in a pluralistic and multi-religious society? Does evangelism require Christians to insist that all other religions are false? Does God expect us to convert non-Christians? What does interreligious dialogue and partnership look like in today’s world? What are the ethical and political implications of public discourse about religion? To address these questions, our study of classic and contemporary theological texts will be supplemented by interactions with people from a variety of religious and nonreligious traditions.

      PRA 302. Pastoral Care with Couples & Families. 3 Credits.
      How does our theological perspective on human relationships influence our pastoral responses to couples and families in crisis? What do we mean when we say a family is dysfunctional? What, then, is a “healthy” family? Are there elements of our theological views which serve to further alienate those individuals who do not live in traditional nuclear families? This course will provide students with an opportunity to reflect on these questions (and others that they bring to the course) as they study various authors and approaches within the family systems theory literature (e.g., Boyd-Franklin, Friedman, McGoldrick, and Minuchin). Each student will be required to complete a detailed family genogram in order to gain a better self-understanding and competence with this assessment tool. Video tapes of seasoned therapists in live sessions as well as role playing in small groups will provide students with an opportunity to improve their care-giving and counseling skills. In addition, the course will consist of readings, lectures and discussions. A final paper will be required.

      SCW 101. CWInterfaith – SVM Church & World – Interfaith. 3 Credits.
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “interfaith” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      SCW 102. CWInterfaith – SVM Church & World – Interfaith. 3 Credits.
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “interfaith” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      SCW 103. CWInterfaith – SVM Church & World – Interfaith. 3 Credits.
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “interfaith” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      SMN 100. Non-Parish Internship I. 3 Credits.
      SMN100 Non-Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SMN 201. Non-Parish Internship I & II. 6 Credits. SMN201 Non-Parish Internship I & II requires at least 400 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SMP 100. Parish Internship I. 3 Credits.
      SMP100 Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SMP 201. Parish Internship I & II. 6 Credits.
      SMP201 Parish Internship I & II requires at least 400 hours in an approved parish setting and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      THE 101. Theology I. 3 Credits.
      The purpose of this course is to gain an introductory knowledge of the doctrines of revelation, God, and humanity and their systematic interrelations. We concentrate on the development of doctrine in the early creeds and classical reformed statements, as well as in recent constructive works. The general goal is to obtain a background and preparation suitable for the constructive task in theology for parish ministers.

      THE 127. Trauma & Transfigured Christian Faith. 3 Credits.
      Traumatic stories must be reframed as we gain new understandings of God’s presence in a broken world. By availing ourselves to the transfigured Christian faith cultivated in the context of marginalized existence, we will examine the mass experience of loss, longing, chronic mourning, and pain. Using the voices of contemporary theologians who confront the questions of where is God in the suffering, injustice and violence, seminarians will investigate theological perspectives relevant to the redeeming power of God’s grace.

      THE 427. Trauma & Transfigured Christian Faith. 3 Credits.
      Traumatic stories must be reframed as we gain new understandings of God’s presence in a broken world. By availing ourselves to the transfigured Christian faith cultivated in the context of marginalized existence, we will examine the mass experience of loss, longing, chronic mourning, and pain. Using the voices of contemporary theologians who confront the questions of where is God in the suffering, injustice and violence, seminarians will investigate theological perspectives relevant to the redeeming power of God’s grace.

      THM 401. ThM Seminar I. 3 Credits.
      This interdisciplinary colloquium explores the question of how we know and various aspects of beginning a quest for knowledge and wisdom. Specific attention will be given to how these quests are imagined and shaped by various theological disciplines and the “ultimate questions” raised. 3 credit hours.

  • Charlotte Campus

    • BIB 170. New Testament I (MACE). 3 Credits.
      This course introduces students to the four canonical gospels, the cultural environment in which they arose, and basic methods for interpreting them in English translation. The theological message and contemporary significance of each gospel will be studied with a focus on using sound principles of interpretation in educational settings. Seminar sessions designed to enable students to develop their exegetical and teaching skills complement lectures and assigned readings in which current biblical scholarship is presented.

      BIB 221. New Testament I: Gospels. 3 Credits.
      On the basis of lectures, readings, class discussions, and other projects undertaken in smaller groups, students are introduced to the subject matter of the four canonical gospels, the cultural environment in which they arose, and the basic methodologies for interpreting them. Content and interpretation of the gospels are explored through the Greek text. The emphasis is on mastering methods of contemporary gospel investigation.

      BIB 324. Anthropology of the Psalms. 3 Credits.
      The reformers called the Psalms a “mirror of the soul.” And indeed, beyond the borderlines of centuries and cultures, the Psalms have given expression to people’s reflections about their social and existential conditions, their sufferings and joys, and their hopes and fears. The Psalms have shaped the language of liturgy as well as of personal prayer. The main goal of this class will be to explore through rhetoric, semantic, and iconic analysis these “mirroring” capacities of the Psalms. Besides close readings of the biblical material, this will also include studies of contemporary poetry and prayers. Prerequisite: BIB311 or BIB260

      CPE 100. Clinical Pastoral Education I. 3 Credits.
      CPE100 Clinical Pastoral Education I requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff.

      CPE 201. Clinical Pastoral Education I & II. 6 Credits. CPE201 Clinical Pastoral Education I & II requires at least 400 hours at an approved CPE center and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff.

      EDU 166. The Christian Life. 3 Credits.
      Through study and practice, this course introduces students to Christian devotion, prayer, worship, and spiritual disciplines. This course fosters personal spiritual growth and equips the educator to be a resource for spiritual development in the congregation. (Formerly listed as THE167)

      EDU 201. Faith & Human Development. 3 Credits.
      This course explores historical and contemporary theories of human psychology and faith across the lifespan, with particular attention to how these theories shape teaching and learning among all ages in the church. Prerequisites: EDU186 or permission of the instructor.

      HST 101. History of Christianity I. 3 Credits.
      This course is a survey of the history of Christianity from the second century through the sixteenth century. The purpose is to familiarize students with basic developments in doctrine and institutional life from the age of the early apologists through the time of the Reformers. Considerable attention is given to primary sources so that students have an opportunity to become acquainted with the literature characteristic of the period being studied.

      HST 135. CWInterfaith – Christian encounter with World Religions. 3 Credits.
      There is little within contemporary discourse more contentious and theologically challenging than religious pluralism. Often fraught with prejudice and conflict, the encounter of people from different religious faiths also provides valuable opportunities for critical reflection, understanding, and respect. Given the reality of religious pluralism within both a global and local context, this course will allow students to critically reflect on key issues arising from the encounter of Christians with people of different faith traditions. Identifying central teachings of major world religions, including Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism and Judaism, we will examine the potential benefits and challenges of inter-religious encounter for Christian ministry in a local context.

      PRA 102. Introduction to Pastoral Care. 3 Credits.
      In any form of ministry, the pastor faces multiple demands for help in situations of death, divorce, aging, reactions to job stress, and more. This course introduces the student to basic resources that are available to assist in the ministry of pastoral care, provides an opportunity to develop pastoral skills in a clinical setting, and encourages students to begin the process of integrating theory and practice into a sense of pastoral identity.

      PRA 302. Pastoral Care with Couples & Families. 3 Credits.
      How does our theological perspective on human relationships influence our pastoral responses to couples and families in crisis? What do we mean when we say a family is dysfunctional? What, then, is a “healthy” family? Are there elements of our theological views which serve to further alienate those individuals who do not live in traditional nuclear families? This course will provide students with an opportunity to reflect on these questions (and others that they bring to the course) as they study various authors and approaches within the family systems theory literature (e.g., Boyd-Franklin, Friedman, McGoldrick, and Minuchin). Each student will be required to complete a detailed family genogram in order to gain a better self-understanding and competence with this assessment tool. Video tapes of seasoned therapists in live sessions as well as role playing in small groups will provide students with an opportunity to improve their care-giving and counseling skills. In addition, the course will consist of readings, lectures and discussions. A final paper will be required.

      SCW 101. CWInterfaith – SVM Church & World – Interfaith. 3 Credits.
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “interfaith” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      SCW 103. CWEvangelism – SVM Church & World – Evangelism. 3 Credits.
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “evangelism” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      SMN 100. Non-Parish Internship I. 3 Credits.
      SMN100 Non-Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SMN 101. Non-Parish Internship II. 3 Credits.
      SMN101 Non-Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: SMN100.

      SMN 201. Non-Parish Internship I & II. 6 Credits.
      SMN201 Non-Parish Internship I & II requires at least 400 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SMP 100. Parish Internship I. 3 Credits.
      SMP100 Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SMP 101. Parish Internship II. 3 Credits.
      SMP101 Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: SMP100

      SMP 201. Parish Internship I & II. 6 Credits.
      SMP201 Parish Internship I & II requires at least 400 hours in an approved parish setting and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      THE 101. Theology I. 3 Credits.
      The purpose of this course is to gain an introductory knowledge of the doctrines of revelation, God, and humanity and their systematic interrelations. We concentrate on the development of doctrine in the early creeds and classical reformed statements, as well as in recent constructive works. The general goal is to obtain a background and preparation suitable for the constructive task in theology for parish ministers.

  • Extended Campus Program (ECP)

    • EDU 151. Pol, Prog& Mission for Presbt Educators. 3 Credits.
      Students will examine the role and responsibilities of the certified Christian educator in the light of the polity and procedures of the Presbyterian church as they explore denominational resources and programs that enrich parish life, foster good stewardship, and facilitate community outreach.

      EDU 186. The Teaching Ministry of the Church. 3 Credits.
      This course seeks to equip students to fulfill their role as educational leaders as pastors and/or Christian educators. It includes biblical and theological reflection on the teaching ministry of the church. It considers the contextual nature of education and pays attention to basic planning skills, teaching methods and pedagogical concepts for learners across the lifespan. Teaching practice in the classroom and/or in congregational settings is an essential component of this course.

      SMN 100. Non-Parish Internship I. 3 Credits.
      SMN100 Non-Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SMP 100. Parish Internship I. 3 Credits.
      SMP100 Parish Internship I requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SMP 201. Parish Intership I & II. 6 Credits.
      SMP201 Parish Internship I & II requires at least 400 hours in an approved parish setting and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.


Spring 2017

  • Richmond Campus

    • BIB 002. Elementary Biblical Hebrew II. 3 Credits.
      The second term of a year-long study of Hebrew grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, beginning with elementary forms and moving into the reading of simple prose texts in the Hebrew Bible.

      BIB 005. Elementary Biblical Greek II. 3 Credits.
      The second term of a year-long course introducing the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of New Testament Greek. In this half of the course, students begin translating texts from the New Testament.

      BIB 109. The Bible from the Underside. 3 Credits.
      Open to all master’s level students. The Bible is the property of the whole church, and each reading community within the church offers insights that deepen and broaden the church’s vision of God and God’s work in the world. This course surveys recent biblical scholarship emerging from liberation communities in the United States and around the globe. Special attention is given to Latin American, African, Asian, feminist, and African American voices.

      BIB 128. The Lure of Transcendence. 3 Credits.
      When confronted with the primordial prohibition—“Do not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil” (Gen 2:16)—human beings have found it virtually impossible to resist the lure of transcendence. Should we, must we, agree to live like mortals, with the attending limitations of power and knowledge? The biblical witness clearly links the temptation to do otherwise with sin and its consequences. Might we, should we, aspire to transcend our limitations, to live as God’s “near equals”? The biblical witness just as clearly affirms that human beings are created in God’s image with capacities that are roughly God-like. This course will explore the creative tension between these different responses to the lure of transcendence and their ethical ramifications. Biblical perspectives drawn from both Old and New Testaments will be placed in critical conversation with readings from theology and philosophy (e.g., Kant and Sartre), the Greek tragedians and the Romantic poets (e.g., Aeschylus and Coleridge), and with cognitive scientists and neurotheologians, who study the neuromechanics of transcendence (e.g., Patricia Churchland and Andrew Newberg). Two questions set the compass for reflection: How should faith communities embedded in local, national, and global socio-political contexts respond to the lure of transcendence? What are the risks and rewards of yielding to the temptation to live as if we are God’s near equals?

      BIB 129. Gospel of Luke. 3 Credits.
      The Gospel of Luke is a work of literary and theological artistry; this gospel offers a cast of memorable characters and some of Jesus’s most intriguing parables. It also presents many challenging texts and themes, including images of radical social and political reversal. Readers encounter a message of extravagant grace and, at the same time, a summons to costly commitment. Moreover, Luke’s presentation of women and of Jewish people and religion continue to inspire lively debate. How are we to interpret these texts? How might 21st century readers respond to and live out Luke’s bold theological and ethical vision? This course will explore such questions of interpretation, proclamation, and ethical embodiment.

      BIB 260. Old Testament II (MACE). 3 Credits.
      Prerequisite: BIB160. This course introduces the prophetic literature of ancient Israel and the later canonical books of the Old Testament in English translation. Attention is given to the historical contexts, literary history, and theological themes of this literature and its significance for the work of the church today. Seminar sessions designed to enable students to develop their exegetical and teaching skills complement lectures and assigned readings in which current biblical scholarship is presented.

      BIB 270. New Testament II (MACE). 3 Credits. Prerequisite: BIB170. This course will focus on the Acts of the Apostles and the epistles of Paul, but also introduces the general epistles and the Revelation of John. Close reading of the English text will illumine the particular situations reflected in the literature, the cultural contexts of the early church, and the theological perspectives in these writings. Seminar sessions designed to enable students to develop their exegetical and teaching skills complement lectures and assigned readings in which current biblical scholarship is presented.

      BIB 311. Old Testament II: Prophet. 3 Credits.
      This course introduces the prophetic books and provides practice in the exegesis of text in the Hebrew Bible. Primary concentration is on the texts of the English and Hebrew Bibles, although secondary literature is used as a resource. Attention is given to the arrangement and content of the prophetic books, the theology of the prophets, and the history of prophecy and prophetic literature in Israel. A number of texts from Isaiah are studied to develop a procedure for exegesis that is useful in teaching and preaching.

      BIB 321. New Testament II. Paul and Acts. 3 Credits.
      This course involves a study of the theological problems and positions of the primitive church as they can be deduced from Acts, and a study of the major theological motifs of Paul as found in his major letters. Additional reflection on the literary problems attaching to Acts and the Pauline corpus will be offered to provide an overview of the world within which the primitive church sought its form of life and thought.

      CPE 101. Clinical Pastoral Education II. 3 Credits. CPE101 Clinical Pastoral Education II requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff. Prerequisite: CPE100. 

      CPE 201. Clinical Pastoral Education I & II. 6 Credits. CPE201 Clinical Pastoral Education I & II requires at least 400 hours at an approved CPE center and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff.

       EDU 186. The Teaching Ministry of the Church. 3 Credits.
      This course seeks to equip students to fulfill their role as educational leaders as pastors and/or Christian educators. It includes biblical and theological reflection on the teaching ministry of the church. It considers the contextual nature of education and pays attention to basic planning skills, teaching methods and pedagogical concepts for learners across the lifespan. Teaching practice in the classroom and/or in congregational settings is an essential component of this course.

      HST 107. Xian, Jud, & Islam in Convers & Conflict. 3 Credits.
      The relationship among the three Abrahamic traditions has become an important topic in recent years, especially in light of the actions and beliefs of extremists. This course will explore previous moments both of conflict and engagement between Christianity, Judaism, and Islam. Analyzing primary texts and archaeological evidence, this class will consider the multi-cultural, multi-religious periods of these three traditions at the rise of Islam and several centuries later in al-Andalus. How do these previous historical moments shape modern Christianity(ies)? And what might we learn from the interactions among our historical forbearers?

      HST 201. History of Christianity II. 3 Credits.
      The purposes of the course are to provide the student with basic knowledge of the history of Christianity since the time of the Reformation, to enable the student to develop skills in historical method and explanation, and to assess the past for the present work of ministry. The aim is also to stimulate a historical consciousness and an appreciation of the church as a historical community. The course provides a preparation for electives in this field and for continuing education in history. Emphasis is placed on American Christianity, the missionary movement, and the ecumenical movement.

      INT 108. Theology and Literature. 3 Credits.
      Students explore theological and biblical themes in contemporary novels, short stories, poetry and plays. In addition to class discussion, facility in using such material in a pastoral context is demonstrated in the development of sermons or lessons plans.

      INT 134. Union Presbyterian Seminary Choir. 0.75 Credits.
      Through participation in choir students will become familiar with a wide range of music appropriate for worship. They will plan and present programs that coordinate liturgy and music.

      INT 136. Prayer & Temperament Spiritual Formation. 1.50 Credits.
      This course is an experiential survey of the varied prayer forms of the diverse Myers-Briggs personality types. Introverts prefer a form of prayer different from Extraverts. Intuitives approach God from a different point of view than Sensers. Feelers pray in a different way from Thinkers. Judging persons want structure in their prayer life, while Perceiving persons was flexibility. While there is preference for the type of prayer that matches natural temperament, all prayer forms will be engaged. This course will also look at how these prayer types may help one be still and know living in a fast paced constantly changing world.

      PRA 102. Introductions to Pastoral Care. 3 Credits.
      In any form of ministry, the pastor faces multiple demands for help in situations of death, divorce, aging, reactions to job stress, and more. This course introduces the student to basic resources that are available to assist in the ministry of pastoral care, provides an opportunity to develop pastoral skills in a clinical setting, and encourages students to begin the process of integrating theory and practice into a sense of pastoral identity.

      PRA 112. Presbyterian Polity. 3 Credits.
      This course is designed for students who plan to serve as ordained ministers in the Presbyterian Church (USA). Polity and administration are integral to functioning effectively as a pastor, both in the local congregation and throughout the governing bodies of the church. This course deals with the biblical, historical, and theological bases of church polity and administration, as well as theoretical and practical dimensions. Particular emphasis is placed upon governance and worship issues related to preparation for the ordination examinations in church polity and the sacraments.

      PRA 215. Preaching in the 21st Century. 3 Credits.
      Prerequisite: PRA103. As the church continues changing in this new age, so does its ministry of proclamation. This advanced preaching course invites students to consider the contexts, theories, and practices that characterize current conversations in the field of homiletics. Of particular importance for this course are (1) constructing and reflecting on a narrative of homiletic theory and practice in North America; (2) understanding the ways that current homiletic theories interact with interdisciplinary partners; and (3) as a practicing theologian, integrating that knowledge toward transformative preaching and ministerial practice. In addition to written assignments and presentations, students will preach one sermon and give feedback to one another.

      SCW 101. CWInterfaith – SVM Church & World – Interfaith. 3 Credits.
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “interfaith” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      SCW 102. CWCom Engage – SVM Church & World – Comm Engagement. 3 Credits.
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “community engagement” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      SCW 103. CWEvangelism – SVM Church & World – Evangelism. 3 Credits.
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “evangelism” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      SMN 101. Non-Parish Internship II. 3 Credits.
      SMN101 Non-Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: SMN100.

      SMN 201. Non-Parish Internship I & II. 6 Credits.
      SMN201 Non-Parish Internship I & II requires at least 400 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SMP 101. Parish Internship II. 3 Credits.
      SMP101 Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: SMP100

      SMP 201. Parish Internship I & II. 6 Credits.
      SMP201 Parish Internship I & II requires at least 400 hours in an approved parish setting and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      THE 102. Introduction to Christian Ethics. 3 Credits.
      This course introduces the discipline of theological ethics in ways appropriate to the interests of pastors. A range of contemporary proposals are considered and evaluated by reference to the Christian tradition and selected moral problems. Course format includes readings, lectures, seminars, mid-term, and final examinations.

      THE 128. Jesus, War, & the Church. 3 Credits.
      What should Christians think about and how should they respond to the reality of state-sanctioned violence? We will look at original source material as we review the development of the church’s teachings on war from Jesus to Augustine. Then, after exploring categories of ethical and theological analysis, we will examine contemporary proposals for how Christians should respond to questions concerning the use of lethal force today.

      THE 201. Theology II. 3 Credits.
      The purpose of this course is to explore the doctrines of Christology, the Christian life (regeneration, justification, sanctification), ecclesiology, and eschatology. We will concentrate on classical Reformed statements of these doctrines as well as more recent statements. The goal is to obtain a background in systematic theology suitable for parish ministers.

      THM 402. ThM Seminar II. 3 Credits.
      This interdisciplinary colloquium explores the question of why we know and the purposes/objectives of knowledge and wisdom. Sessions will be primarily organized around presentations of student and faculty works-in-progress and formal responses as springboards for conversation. 3 credit hours.

  • Charlotte Campus

    • BIB 167. Perspectives on Jesus. 3 Credits.
      This course explores a variety of artistic interpretations of Jesus of Nazareth — from early Christian mosaics, to the classical period of painting, sculpture, and music, to contemporary film. Students will analyze theological motifs, educational possibilities, and aesthetic dimensions of works presented in class. 

      BIB 270. New Testaments II (MACE). 3 Credits. Prerequisite: BIB170. This course will focus on the Acts of the Apostles and the epistles of Paul, but also introduces the general epistles and the Revelation of John. Close reading of the English text will illumine the particular situations reflected in the literature, the cultural contexts of the early church, and the theological perspectives in these writings. Seminar sessions designed to enable students to develop their exegetical and teaching skills complement lectures and assigned readings in which current biblical scholarship is presented.

      BIB 321. New Testament II: Paul and Acts. 3 Credits. This course involves a study of the theological problems and positions of the primitive church as they can be deduced from Acts, and a study of the major theological motifs of Paul found in his major letters. Additional reflection on the literary problems attaching to Acts and the Pauline corpus will be offered to provide an overview of the world within which the primitive church sought its form of life and thought.

      CPE 101. Clinical Pastoral Education II. 3 Credits.
      CPE101 Clinical Pastoral Education II requires at least 200 hours at an approved CPE center and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff. Prerequisite: CPE100.

      CPE 201. Clinical Pastoral Education I & II. 6 Credits.
      CPE201 Clinical Pastoral Education I & II requires at least 400 hours at an approved CPE center and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills that enable them to minister to persons in times of physical, emotional, and spiritual need. Clinical Pastoral Education programs include opportunities for group processing, individual conferences with a certified supervisor, and interaction with patients and their families as well as clinical staff.

      EDU 186. The Teaching Ministry of the Church. 3 Credits.
      This course seeks to equip students to fulfill their role as educational leaders as pastors and/or Christian educators. It includes biblical and theological reflection on the teaching ministry of the church. It considers the contextual nature of education and pays attention to basic planning skills, teaching methods and pedagogical concepts for learners across the lifespan. Teaching practice in the classroom and/or in congregational settings is an essential component of this course.

      HST 201. History of Christianity II. 3 Credits.
      The purposes of the course are to provide the student with basic knowledge of the history of Christianity since the time of the Reformation, to enable the student to develop skills in historical method and explanation, and to assess the past for the present work of ministry. The aim is also to stimulate a historical consciousness and an appreciation of the church as a historical community. The course provides a preparation for electives in this field and for continuing education in history. Emphasis is placed on American Christianity, the missionary movement, and the ecumenical movement.

      INT 263. Contemporary Theology & Education. 3 Credits.
      This course brings the fields of theology and educational theory into explicit dialogue, considering five different contemporary approaches to theology and how they are contributing to the design and practice of Christian Education today. Required for MA/MDiv students. May be taken as a theology or education elective by MA students. 

      PRA 103. Preaching & Worship. 3 Credits.
      This basic introductory course draws upon biblical and traditional resources in helping students understand the theology of proclamation and worship. Students learn to plan worship services and to prepare and present sermons, and they serve as evaluators and colleagues to one another.

      PRA 143. The Church & Sacred Music. 3 Credits.
      In collaboration with the Church Music Institute, this class will offer seminary students a historical overview of music in the worship of the church, a chance to integrate worship and music understandings in theory and in practice, and an experience of a local music festival where area church music leaders and musicians work together for a celebration of and reflection on the music of Christian worship.

      SCW 101. CWInterfaith – SVM Church & World – Interfaith. 3 Credits.
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “interfaith” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      SCW 102. CWCom Engage – SVM Church & World – CommEngagement. 3 Credits.
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “community engagement” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      SCW 103. CWEvangelism – SVM Church & World – Evangelism 3 Credits.
      Three credit-hour internship that satisfies the “evangelism” component of the Church in the World degree requirements.

      SMN 101. Non-Parish Internship II. 3 Credits.
      SMN101 Non-Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: SMN100.

      SMN 201. Non-Parish Internship I & II. 6 Credits. SMN201 Non-Parish Internship I & II requires at least 400 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaithrelations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SMP 101. Parish Internship II. 3 Credits.
      SMN201 Non-Parish Internship I & II requires at least 400 hours in an approved non-parish setting and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. A non-parish setting is an approved internship site in an agency, institution, or non-profit that either provides services to constituents such as the elderly, marginalized persons or groups, or focuses on cultural diversity or interfaith relations. Non-parish internships afford students many opportunities for growth, including becoming more proficient in building relationships as an individual and part of an organization, enhancing awareness of social justice issues and their impact on marginalized persons, and exploring the intersection of faith and community by building upon classroom skills and engaging in theological and vocational reflection with a supervisor, the instructor, and their peers. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      SMP 201. Parish Internship I & II. 6 Credits.
      SMP201 Parish Internship I & II requires at least 400 hours in an approved parish setting and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.

      THE 201. Theology II. 3 Credits.
      The purpose of this course is to explore the doctrines of christology, the Christian life (regeneration, justification, sanctification), ecclesiology, and eschatology. We will concentrate on classical Reformed statements of these doctrines as well as more recent statements. The goal is to obtain a background in systematic theology suitable for parish ministers.

  • Extended Campus Program (ECP)

    • BIB 170. New Testament I (MACE). 3 Credits.
      This course introduces students to the four canonical gospels, the cultural environment in which they arose, and basic methods for interpreting them in English translation. The theological message and contemporary significance of each gospel will be studied with a focus on using sound principles of interpretation in educational settings. Seminar sessions designed to enable students to develop their exegetical and teaching skills complement lectures and assigned readings in which current biblical scholarship is presented.

      EDU 162. Curriculum/Resources for Christian Ed. 3 Credits.
      This course familiarizes students with the wide range of curriculum resources available, involves them in evaluation of these resources, helps them select resources for different church programs, and introduces them to ways of doing curriculum design. These skills for ministry are set in the framework of curriculum theory and history.

      SMP 101. Parish Internship II. 3 Credits.
      SMP101 Parish Internship II requires at least 200 hours in an approved congregational setting and earns one credit during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: SMP100

      SMP 201. Parish Internship I & II. 6 Credits.
      SMP201 Parish Internship I & II requires at least 400 hours in an approved parish setting and earns two credits during one term at UPSem. Students develop skills in areas of congregational life such as preaching and presiding in worship, pastoral care, Christian education, serving and leading committees, spiritual development, church polity, and group and staff dynamics. Parish internships afford students a unique opportunity to apply the theories and practices they have studied in class while reflecting with a supervisor, the instructor, mentors, and peers on how their experiences relate to the nature and purpose of ministry and their individual sense of vocation. Prerequisite: Instructor Permission.


April 2017

  • Richmond Campus

    • BIB 206. Wrestling with Scripture. 3 Credits.
      This course aims to help students articulate an understanding of biblical authority in relation to the critical study of Scripture and the community of faith. It will review the formation of the canon, varied understandings of the nature and authority of Scripture, and historic principles of Reformed biblical interpretation. It will also consider the practice of arguing about Scripture, interpretive strategies for engaging difficult texts with integrity, and the use of the Bible in Christian ethical reflection. Prerequisites: BIB160/211 or BIB170/221, or permission of instructor.

      EDU 220. Digital Culture & Spirituality. 3 Credits.
      Since social networking, gaming, and other online activities have become major pastimes among many age groups, contemporary experiences of Christian spirituality are significantly shaped by digital culture. This course explores the ways in which constructive theologies and practices of Christian identity, community, and education may evolve in relation to digital ideologies and experiences.

      HST 308. Pilgrimage Among Early Christians. 3 Credits.
      Christianity emerged from a society fascinated with visiting the shrines of various deities and heroes. This class examines how early Christians adopted and adapted these cultural practices, focusing their sights on the burial sites of martyrs, the dwellings of holy men and women, and especially on the Holy Land. It also considers how these ancient travelers remembered and conveyed their experiences to their Christian brethren. Students spend the semester exploring ancient texts and material culture from the third to ninth centuries alongside modern theorizations of memory and space. 

      INT 307. Children/Youth/Bible & Xian Worship. 3 Credits.
      Prerequisites: PRA103 and at least one core course in Old or New Testament; or permission of the instructors. This interdisciplinary course helps students connect concerns for children and youth with the Bible and Christian worship. The course explores the historical, social, literary, and theological contours of children and youth in the Bible. By considering theological, historical, developmental, and liturgical resources, students will also reflect on the roles of children and youth in the worship life of Christian congregations.

      PRA 133. CWComEnage – Musical Resources for Pastoral Care. 3 Credits.
      This course will provide students with basic fundamentals for understanding various styles of music—both sacred and secular—and examine how music may assist ministers in providing pastoral care. Resources from the fields of music therapy, psychology and pastoral theology will guide the study of hymn texts and tunes, songs from the popular culture as well as instrumental music. Each student will develop a “play list” for addressing pastoral care concerns including ministry with adolescents in crisis, bereavement, and mental illness.

      PRA 140. CWCom Engage–Ministry to the Family of the Alcoholic. 3 Credits.
      Ministry to the Family of the Alcoholic is a specialized form of Pastoral Care that involves healing of the body, mind, and spirit of each family member and the family system as a whole. Beyond allowing 12-Step programs to meet in its basement, the Christian church has a responsibility and an opportunity to heal, sustain, guide and reconcile its members who are adversely affected by alcohol abuse. This course is designed to introduce the student to the causes of alcoholism in the family and the care of such families.

      THE 114. Codes of Ethics in Freedom Narratives. 3 Credits.
      This course is an interdisciplinary inquiry into the nature of the religious experience of the Africans who were enslaved in the Americas. A close textual reading of slave narratives, letters, speeches, interviews, and autobiographies will spell out how this history affected Christians in previous generations and currently.

  • Charlotte Campus

    • BIB 103. Survey of the Bible and Its Theologies. 3 Credits.
      This course provides an opportunity for the student to acquire a detailed knowledge of the contents of the Bible through homework assignments and in-class tests. Class lectures deal with the overarching motifs and theological structures of the Bible, as well as with the theology of separate biblical books. The English texts will be used as the basis for homework assignments and in-class tests. Class lectures will include selected references to the original languages of the texts. Prior knowledge of Biblical Hebrew and New Testament Greek may prove helpful, but is not required.

      EDU 189. Using Child/Adolescent Lit in Church. 3 Credits.
      This elective course engages students in considering 1) rationale for using children’s books and adolescent literature in the local church, 2) process and criteria for evaluating and selecting books to use, 3) specific ways to use these books so learners are actively engaged. The course is open to all students, with no prerequisites.

      HST 132. Intro Christian Mission. 3 Credits.
      This course will serve as an introduction to the history and theology of Christian Mission. Key missiological paradigms will be identified and studied within the history of Christianity in order to engage with contemporary issues of global and local mission discourse. Th course will cover biblical foundations for mission, mission in the early church, mission during the modern era of colonial expansion, and mission in and beyond the twentieth century. Critical reflection will be shaped through study of the following theological themes: salvation/liberation; evangelism/ecumenism; the Christian encounter with world religions/interfaith dialogue; inculturation; religious identity; ecclesiology. No prerequisites.

      PRA 112. Presbyterian Polity. 3 Credits.
      This course is designed for students who plan to serve as ordained ministers in the Presbyterian Church (USA). Polity and administration are integral to functioning effectively as a pastor, both in the local congregation and throughout the governing bodies of the church. This course deals with the biblical, historical, and theological bases of church polity and administration, as well as theoretical and practical dimensions. Particular emphasis is placed upon governance and worship issues related to preparation for the ordination examinations in church polity and the sacraments.

      PRA 218. Baptism and Christian Initiation. 3 Credits. This course explores a study of the history and theology of baptism with special attention to biblical and historical documents as well as recent ecumenical developments. In addition, the course will provide workshop opportunities to develop presiding skills and provide practical theological application to the place of the sacraments in congregational life. The course will include recent developments in baptismal preparation and will encourage development of curriculum and/or sermons for use in the congregation. Prerequisite: PRA103 Introduction to Preaching & Worship Enrollment Limit: 15


May 2017

  • Richmond Campus

    • BIB 130. The Bible & Film. 3 Credits.
      This course will examine major themes/texts in Scripture and how these are addressed in film. Rather than focusing on the cinematic depiction of events in the biblical narrative, we will consider such issues as the portrayal of divine justice, movies that grapple with theodicy (especially in the story of Job), redemption, the question of an afterlife, apocalyptic themes, and a host of other topics. The course will engage the wealth of recent scholarly discussion on this topic, including methodological approaches that assist in the evaluation of films in relation to the Bible.

      EDU 127. Worship, Sacraments & Education. 3 Credits. This course will explore the theology of worship and sacraments, especially from a Reformed perspective, and will consider the relationships between worship, sacraments, and education. Topics include participation in worship for all the baptized, the unity of Word and Table, children and worship, preparation for baptism, and preparation for ordination as deacons and elders. Students will design educational events and engage in demonstration teaching with mutual review and critique. Formerly listed as PRA127

      EDU 192. Annual Recreation Workshop Conference. 3 Credits.
      Held in conjunction with The Annual Recreation Workshop at Montreat, North Carolina, this course is [will be] an experiential study of current trends and practices in recreational ministry. The course begins with attendance at the Annual Recreation Workshop, followed by a time on the Richmond campus for class sharing from May 15 to 24. The on-campus daily schedule and sharing will be designed collaboratively upon return to UPSem. For information about ARW, please go to www.recreationworkshop.org. The dates for ARW are May 7 – 12. Please note that students must register during the UPSem May registration period, and with ARW. There are partial and full scholarships available. The ARW registration deadline for scholarships is March 1. Once you have registered at UPSem through Self Service and at Montreat and applied for the ARW scholarship, if you are interested in additional financial aid to attend the event, contact April Swofford, aswofford@upsem.edu. Failure to register at both places will jeopardize course participation.

      INT 041. Italy Travel Seminar. 3 Credits.
      To develop a complete mind: Study the science of art; Study the art of science. Learn how to see. Realize that everything connects with everything else. — Leonardo da Vinci This seminar will be conducted on tour (approximately three weeks) in Italy. The learning objectives focus on the intersections between art, science, and religion and their importance for faith communities. With excursions originating from three major locations (Rome, Florence, and Venice), students will explore important archaeological sites, museums, observatories, opera houses, and churches and cathedrals. They will examine specific paintings, frescoes, mosaics, sculptures, monuments, and other works of art and science with the benefit of on-site instruction from tour leaders and resident art historians. Preparation for travel includes required readings and introductory sessions that provide historical and cultural background for exploring the sites and objects on the itinerary. There will be a fee in addition to the usual tuition fees. Seminary travel subsidies will be made available to students taking the course for credit. Procedures outlined in Registration for Intercultural Courses on page 46 are applicable.

      PRA 116. Love and Grace. 3 Credits.
      This course will explore the relationship between psychosocial perspectives on human love and a variety of Reformed theological perspectives on the grace of God.

      INT 046. Asia Travel Seminar. 3 Credits.
      This cross-cultural course studies the impact of the gospel in Asian countries by visiting Christian churches, seminaries, and leaders and by studying the history and culture of selected countries. Enrollment is limited and certain restrictions apply. Students must apply and complete the orientation and post-trip meetings.

      PRA 145. Evangelism in Rural Contexts. 3 Credits. Though national and global population trends predict a continuing increase in urbanization, seminary graduates are likely to find more ministry opportunities in small town and rural communities than in urban or suburban contexts. With many of these churches struggling or unable to afford full-time pastoral leadership, the ministry challenges are even greater. Rural contexts therefore present unique opportunities and challenges for evangelism, church revitalization, congregational growth, and missional ministry. Through reading, field trips, and interaction with rural ministry practitioners, this course will give students a practical foundation for ministry in rural contexts.

      PRA 225. Preaching the Gospel of John. 3 Credits. Prerequisite: PRA103. This course will provide students with extensive practice in the preparation and preaching of sermons. Students will be introduced to various methods of sermon development. All exegetical work in this course will be done with an eye toward preaching. This course will include lectures, class discussions, as well as practical guidance on the preparation, planning, and delivery of sermons. Sermons written and preached in this class will be based on texts in the Gospel of John.

  • Charlotte Campus

    • BIB 115.  The Bible, Race & Religion. 3 Credits.
      That does the Bible have to say about race? In the course of the history of the United States, the Bible has been used as a source document to speak about issues of race. Prior to the Civil War (and even afterwards), both pro-slavery advocates and those opposed to slavery found support in the pages of scripture (often from the same texts). In this course, students will explore secondary literature to note how the Bible has been and continues to be utilized in this discussion, and they will engage exegetically certain key periscopes employed in these debates. Finally, students will be asked to derive a theological paradigm for interpersonal relationships consistent with a renewed understanding of biblical instruction.

      EDU 192. Annual Recreation Workshop Conference. 3 Credits.
      Held in conjunction with The Annual Recreation Workshop at Montreat, North Carolina, this course is [will be] an experiential study of current trends and practices in recreational ministry. The course begins with attendance at the Annual Recreation Workshop, followed by a time on the Richmond campus for class sharing from May 15 to 24. The on-campus daily schedule and sharing will be designed collaboratively upon return to UPSem. For information about ARW, please go to www.recreationworkshop.org. The dates for ARW are May 7 – 12. Please note that students must register during the UPSem May registration period, and with ARW. There are partial and full scholarships available. The ARW registration deadline for scholarships is March 1. Once you have registered at UPSem through Self Service and at Montreat and applied for the ARW scholarship, if you are interested in additional financial aid to attend the event, contact April Swofford, aswofford@upsem.edu. Failure to register at both places will jeopardize course participation.

      INT 041. Italy Travel Seminar. 3 Credits.
      To develop a complete mind: Study the science of art; Study the art of science. Learn how to see. Realize that everything connects with everything else. — Leonardo da Vinci This seminar will be conducted on tour (approximately three weeks) in Italy. The learning objectives focus on the intersections between art, science, and religion and their importance for faith communities. With excursions originating from three major locations (Rome, Florence, and Venice), students will explore important archaeological sites, museums, observatories, opera houses, and churches and cathedrals. They will examine specific paintings, frescoes, mosaics, sculptures, monuments, and other works of art and science with the benefit of on-site instruction from tour leaders and resident art historians. Preparation for travel includes required readings and introductory sessions that provide historical and cultural background for exploring the sites and objects on the itinerary. There will be a fee in addition to the usual tuition fees. Seminary travel subsidies will be made available to students taking the course for credit. Procedures outlined in Registration for Intercultural Courses on page 46 are applicable.

      NT 046. Asia Travel Seminar. 3 Credits.
      This cross-cultural course studies the impact of the gospel in Asian countries by visiting Christian churches, seminaries, and leaders and by studying the history and culture of selected countries. Enrollment is limited and certain restrictions apply. Students must apply and complete the orientation and post-trip meetings.

      PRA 141. Ecology and Worship. 3 Credits.
      This course examines recent studies in eco-theology in order to develop liturgical rites that reflect care for creation and integrate congregational actions in response to issues of environmental care. Students will prepare and lead services that include special attention to the role of sacraments.